Spivey Consulting Q&A with Adcoms from Yale, Harvard, Penn, Chicago etc.

General admissions strategy questions, what are my chances, discussion of specific application materials like financial aid and scholarships.
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ThaBlackLord
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Re: Spivey Consulting Q&A with Adcoms from Yale, Harvard, Penn, Chicago etc.

Post by ThaBlackLord » Wed Oct 03, 2018 10:43 pm

Hey Spivey team,

The school that I absolutely want to attend is in NYC, would it be a good strategy to apply in a bunch of NYC schools to prove to my target school that I'm committed to being in NYC?

Thanks!

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NikkiLaubenstein
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Re: Spivey Consulting Q&A with Adcoms from Yale, Harvard, Penn, Chicago etc.

Post by NikkiLaubenstein » Thu Oct 04, 2018 11:06 am

notachance3955 wrote:
Tue Oct 02, 2018 6:31 pm
Hi Spivey Team, thanks in advance for taking the time to answer my question.

What is the positive effect, if any, of the prestige of an undergraduate institution (Ivy League)? Can it help a weak LSAT and/or GPA look better? Do STEM degrees also help an application?
Hi!
This is a question admissions officers get all the time! Your cumulative GPA will be the most important factor overall (so it will depend how low you are talking), but law school admissions reviewers will definitely consider both the prestige of the undergraduate school as well as difficulty of your major. Your LSAT and GPA are the two objective pieces that can be calculated and worked in to a formula for evaluation. From there, admissions reviewers take a look at subjective factors like the level of difficulty of your undergraduate school and major. For the most part, STEM majors can be seen as challenging majors, and can also be a plus for adding diverse academic perspectives to an entering class. LSAC provides admissions offices with data on the CAS Report and part of this data includes mean LSAT and GPA information for the applicant’s undergraduate school. This is one way the reviewer can assess your outcomes compared to others at your school, and gives a general sense of that school’s difficulty.

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NikkiLaubenstein
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Re: Spivey Consulting Q&A with Adcoms from Yale, Harvard, Penn, Chicago etc.

Post by NikkiLaubenstein » Thu Oct 04, 2018 11:16 am

mkirm189 wrote:
Wed Oct 03, 2018 2:09 pm
Hi Spivey team,

For those of us applying a substantial time after undergraduate (5+ years for me), how important is it to mention our undergraduate extracurriculars? The applications has space for them but the extracurriculars were not related to law or public policy and seem kind of trivial now compared to the rest of my experience. Should I just go ahead and list all the leadership positions I held in college?

Thank you in advance!
Admissions committees are reviewing your undergraduate extracurriculars for several reasons. They want to see what you chose to be involved in, and also assess the level of involvement – were you a member of a club, or were you the president and founder of the club, for example. They also want to see how much time you spent doing various activities outside of your schoolwork to help better understand things like your time management skills and ability to find balance (so don’t worry that these activities back then didn’t have anything to do with law school!) The activities you chose to be involved in can also help highlight your interests and tell admissions more about you. It can seem unimportant to list these college activities now after 5 years, but I would encourage you to include them in the space provided. You don’t want an admissions reviewer to think you didn’t participate in any extracurriculars. Because you’ve been out of school for several years, they will definitely be paying closer attention to your resume and what you’ve done since graduation! Good luck!

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NikkiLaubenstein
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Re: Spivey Consulting Q&A with Adcoms from Yale, Harvard, Penn, Chicago etc.

Post by NikkiLaubenstein » Thu Oct 04, 2018 11:24 am

ThaBlackLord wrote:
Wed Oct 03, 2018 10:43 pm
Hey Spivey team,

The school that I absolutely want to attend is in NYC, would it be a good strategy to apply in a bunch of NYC schools to prove to my target school that I'm committed to being in NYC?

Thanks!
While this strategy wouldn’t hurt, it might be more impactful to show your target school how enthusiastic you are about THAT SCHOOL and express in other ways why you want to attend law school in NYC and THERE. You can do this by visiting the school (request a meeting with Admissions, take a tour, sit in on a class) and follow your visit up with thank you emails to those with whom you meet. A specific and well done Why X statement for that school can also go a long way in expressing to your target school exactly why it’s the right fit school for you, and part of this discuss can be its location in NYC. You may also find it helpful to reach out to current students and alumni of the school to make connections. This early networking can both give you more to talk about in your Why X essay, but also might allow Admissions to receive positive feedback about your strong interest from those you’ve connected with!

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ThaBlackLord
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Re: Spivey Consulting Q&A with Adcoms from Yale, Harvard, Penn, Chicago etc.

Post by ThaBlackLord » Thu Oct 04, 2018 2:14 pm

NikkiLaubenstein wrote:
Thu Oct 04, 2018 11:24 am
ThaBlackLord wrote:
Wed Oct 03, 2018 10:43 pm
Hey Spivey team,

The school that I absolutely want to attend is in NYC, would it be a good strategy to apply in a bunch of NYC schools to prove to my target school that I'm committed to being in NYC?

Thanks!
While this strategy wouldn’t hurt, it might be more impactful to show your target school how enthusiastic you are about THAT SCHOOL and express in other ways why you want to attend law school in NYC and THERE. You can do this by visiting the school (request a meeting with Admissions, take a tour, sit in on a class) and follow your visit up with thank you emails to those with whom you meet. A specific and well done Why X statement for that school can also go a long way in expressing to your target school exactly why it’s the right fit school for you, and part of this discuss can be its location in NYC. You may also find it helpful to reach out to current students and alumni of the school to make connections. This early networking can both give you more to talk about in your Why X essay, but also might allow Admissions to receive positive feedback about your strong interest from those you’ve connected with!
Thank you for your answer!
When in the cycle do you think should a student request a meeting with admissions or to take a tour? Should I apply and then request those? How is a tour going to affect my chances, how will they know that I took a tour?
My questions may sound stupid, but I'm trying to understand how the whole process works :?

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NikkiLaubenstein
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Re: Spivey Consulting Q&A with Adcoms from Yale, Harvard, Penn, Chicago etc.

Post by NikkiLaubenstein » Fri Oct 05, 2018 2:30 pm

Your questions aren't stupid at all, and in fact are commonly asked by our clients all the time! It can be difficult and costly to travel all over looking at law schools so a strategic approach to visits will benefit you down the road. The answer to your timing question can also vary somewhat depending on many factors. Most law schools will track the fact that you visited (they track lots of things!) and a visit could be used as a strong interest factor when considering your application. Therefore, when you are ready to set up law school visits, be sure to do so officially through the Admissions Office and take advantage of anything you can while there. As mentioned above, this will help you assess a school's fit by talking to admissions, current students, professors, etc., and will also tell the Admissions Office that you are serious about being a student there. Visiting can give you specifics to talk about in your application materials and follow up interactions. An admissions officer will typically make notes on their scheduled meetings with applicants, so if you feel you make a good impression in person, consider visiting soon after submitting your application so that the meeting can accompany your overall admission consideration. If you are unsure about whether or not to apply to a certain law school, visiting beforehand and getting a feel for the school may help you to decide whether or not to apply at all. I hope this helps answer your questions - best of luck with your upcoming visits!

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Re: Spivey Consulting Q&A with Adcoms from Yale, Harvard, Penn, Chicago etc.

Post by publius911 » Sat Oct 06, 2018 11:22 am

Hi Spivey Team - Your advice here and elsewhere has been an invaluable resource and I can't thank you enough for it.

I've worked in finance for four years after graduation and will be applying this cycle. My GPA is a 3.6, but back in college I was advised that, for the purposes of obtaining the best possible job, marginal GPA increases past 3.5 don't differentiate candidates. Instead I spent countless hours obtaining quality internships during the summer, serving in leadership roles in my fraternity, practicing interviewing and networking skills, and working part time during the school year. I also graduated with two bachelor's degrees, which required 150 credits in four years.

If my goal at the time were instead to have gone to the best possible law school, I would not have spent anywhere near as much time on these activities and would have devoted much more time to maximizing my GPA. With AP credits, I could have taken only 4 courses per semester if I wanted to graduate with one degree. Do you think it would be appropriate or helpful to point out these factors in an addendum, or would that appear to be making excuses/addressing things that are obvious?

Thanks!

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ThaBlackLord
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Re: Spivey Consulting Q&A with Adcoms from Yale, Harvard, Penn, Chicago etc.

Post by ThaBlackLord » Sat Oct 06, 2018 11:38 pm

NikkiLaubenstein wrote:
Fri Oct 05, 2018 2:30 pm
Your questions aren't stupid at all, and in fact are commonly asked by our clients all the time! It can be difficult and costly to travel all over looking at law schools so a strategic approach to visits will benefit you down the road. The answer to your timing question can also vary somewhat depending on many factors. Most law schools will track the fact that you visited (they track lots of things!) and a visit could be used as a strong interest factor when considering your application. Therefore, when you are ready to set up law school visits, be sure to do so officially through the Admissions Office and take advantage of anything you can while there. As mentioned above, this will help you assess a school's fit by talking to admissions, current students, professors, etc., and will also tell the Admissions Office that you are serious about being a student there. Visiting can give you specifics to talk about in your application materials and follow up interactions. An admissions officer will typically make notes on their scheduled meetings with applicants, so if you feel you make a good impression in person, consider visiting soon after submitting your application so that the meeting can accompany your overall admission consideration. If you are unsure about whether or not to apply to a certain law school, visiting beforehand and getting a feel for the school may help you to decide whether or not to apply at all. I hope this helps answer your questions - best of luck with your upcoming visits!
Thank you so much for having taken the time to answer, it was really helpful!

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Lankhs
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Re: Spivey Consulting Q&A with Adcoms from Yale, Harvard, Penn, Chicago etc.

Post by Lankhs » Mon Oct 08, 2018 11:38 pm

Hi gang!

I had a question regarding communication. How do different Admissions offices deal with emails, calls, visits, talks, etc. with applicants? I.e would every email I have ever sent to, say, Michigan be added to my applicant file? Does this extend backwards (do they add emails/communication that you had before you applied)? From what I’ve heard, this is how the undergrad process works, but not sure it’s the same for LS.

Thanks!

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Re: Spivey Consulting Q&A with Adcoms from Yale, Harvard, Penn, Chicago etc.

Post by DanielleEarly » Tue Oct 09, 2018 9:25 am

publius911 wrote:
Sat Oct 06, 2018 11:22 am
Hi Spivey Team - Your advice here and elsewhere has been an invaluable resource and I can't thank you enough for it.

I've worked in finance for four years after graduation and will be applying this cycle. My GPA is a 3.6, but back in college I was advised that, for the purposes of obtaining the best possible job, marginal GPA increases past 3.5 don't differentiate candidates. Instead I spent countless hours obtaining quality internships during the summer, serving in leadership roles in my fraternity, practicing interviewing and networking skills, and working part time during the school year. I also graduated with two bachelor's degrees, which required 150 credits in four years.

If my goal at the time were instead to have gone to the best possible law school, I would not have spent anywhere near as much time on these activities and would have devoted much more time to maximizing my GPA. With AP credits, I could have taken only 4 courses per semester if I wanted to graduate with one degree. Do you think it would be appropriate or helpful to point out these factors in an addendum, or would that appear to be making excuses/addressing things that are obvious?

Thanks!
There are some schools that ask you if you believe your transcript is a good reflection of how well you will perform in law school. For those schools, I think you can answer no. However, the reasons you provide are not uncommon so I would err on the side of saying that you were focused on your internships and work during the school year along with your two majors, but I would not talk about the advice about marginal GPA increases.

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DanielleEarly
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Re: Spivey Consulting Q&A with Adcoms from Yale, Harvard, Penn, Chicago etc.

Post by DanielleEarly » Tue Oct 09, 2018 9:26 am

Lankhs wrote:
Mon Oct 08, 2018 11:38 pm
Hi gang!

I had a question regarding communication. How do different Admissions offices deal with emails, calls, visits, talks, etc. with applicants? I.e would every email I have ever sent to, say, Michigan be added to my applicant file? Does this extend backwards (do they add emails/communication that you had before you applied)? From what I’ve heard, this is how the undergrad process works, but not sure it’s the same for LS.

Thanks!
THis will depend from school to school based on the CRM (database) they use. Some keep all of it, others keep record of an email but not the email, and others keep nothing. (But there is no way for you to know from school to school what they do for record keeping.)

jdhopeful_21
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Re: Spivey Consulting Q&A with Adcoms from Yale, Harvard, Penn, Chicago etc.

Post by jdhopeful_21 » Tue Oct 09, 2018 7:39 pm

Hi Spivey Team

I had to cancel my first LSAT score due to complete panic attack during exam. I'm considering cancelling my second LSAT due to test center issue that affected testing environment. How will this reflect on me if I have two cancellations on record? To clarify I've only taken the exam twice including the aforementioned 1st cancellation. Should I cancel for the second time? Also I do plan on taking the exam for 3rd time.

Thank you!

app
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Re: Spivey Consulting Q&A with Adcoms from Yale, Harvard, Penn, Chicago etc.

Post by app » Wed Oct 10, 2018 3:17 am

* Please don't quote

Hi former adcoms,
i have a query related to reapplications multiple times to top schools like hys. i'm a nontraditional applicant with 15-20 years work experience in tech unrelated to law. i focused only on select hys/t6 due to costs associated with leaving my current career in software engineering and the benefit of these schools. i applied several times to select schools but each reject seemed to be due to a reason such as low lsat or late app that i could "fix" except the last one, which makes me question if reapplication is worth it or not.
- no-gpa/superior CAS rating, grad degree, ug done 20 yrs ago, STEM, US citizen, 171 highest lsat, gre 168q/164v
- H apps: applied 2014 w mid-160s lsat (denied w/o wl), last week of 2016 cycle w latest lsat (wl->denied in jun), early in 2017 cycle w latest lsat (js1->denied in Mar w/o wl)
since reject in mar 6 months ago, i've obtained a job with a well-known AMD/samsung/intel type company as software engineer in a currently trending field (previous company was not well known outside tech). is that change worthy enough for H reapplication? since the reject was after js1, does it mean the door is shut forever?
please don't quote

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SD_Spivey_Consulting
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Re: Spivey Consulting Q&A with Adcoms from Yale, Harvard, Penn, Chicago etc.

Post by SD_Spivey_Consulting » Fri Oct 12, 2018 3:10 pm

jdhopeful_21 wrote:
Tue Oct 09, 2018 7:39 pm
Hi Spivey Team

I had to cancel my first LSAT score due to complete panic attack during exam. I'm considering cancelling my second LSAT due to test center issue that affected testing environment. How will this reflect on me if I have two cancellations on record? To clarify I've only taken the exam twice including the aforementioned 1st cancellation. Should I cancel for the second time? Also I do plan on taking the exam for 3rd time.

Thank you!
Hello! Specific advice regarding whether one should retake an LSAT is something we reserve for our clients; however, if you decide to cancel again, providing an explanation is a good idea. Just make sure you don't spend much time explaining away your nerves or complaining about the test center issue. Be brief and to the point or you'll risk sounding whiny. If you take it a third time, make sure to go with the score as a third cancellation will definitely raise eyebrows!

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SD_Spivey_Consulting
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Re: Spivey Consulting Q&A with Adcoms from Yale, Harvard, Penn, Chicago etc.

Post by SD_Spivey_Consulting » Fri Oct 12, 2018 3:17 pm

app wrote:
Wed Oct 10, 2018 3:17 am
* Please don't quote
Without seeing your whole application and prior app materials, it is difficult to say what is happening (except for your first try when your LSAT was less competitive for those schools). There are a number of factors that are likely at play. In general, you are at least making it on to their waitlist and getting an interview, so it seems not all hope is lost. I can't say if your new position is impressive enough to influence the decision, but when reapplying, it is always good to have a new element to your application and it certainly wouldn't hurt you.



Mod edit to remove quoted content: reminder not to quote info that people ask you not to.

wow
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Re: Spivey Consulting Q&A with Adcoms from Yale, Harvard, Penn, Chicago etc.

Post by wow » Sat Oct 13, 2018 1:45 am

Hey Spivey Team,

How do I list that I'm currently traveling on my resume? Certain applications, for example Michigan's, ask me to explicitly state on my resume what I'm doing now, which is living overseas in Asia (I'm from the U.S.), traveling, blogging, and filling out law school apps. I don't really know where to list this, since I'm not working or even volunteering at the moment.

Any advice is helpful.

Thanks.

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BetterCallDonna
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Re: Spivey Consulting Q&A with Adcoms from Yale, Harvard, Penn, Chicago etc.

Post by BetterCallDonna » Sat Oct 13, 2018 2:50 pm

Hi Spivey team,

I'm currently deciding between two PS to submit to Northwestern. One only tangentially relates to law and is more of a story of self-reflection, and the other deals more specifically with why law and why Northwestern. Should I submit the more personal PS and write a one page addendum about why law and why Northwestern (since Northwestern seems to stress talking about professional goals and why Northwestern), or should I just submit the more straight-forward PS with a paragraph talking about why Northwestern at the end? If its relevant, I'm a J-KD.

Thanks!

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JaymeMcKellop
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Re: Spivey Consulting Q&A with Adcoms from Yale, Harvard, Penn, Chicago etc.

Post by JaymeMcKellop » Mon Oct 15, 2018 9:55 pm

wow wrote:
Sat Oct 13, 2018 1:45 am
Hey Spivey Team,

How do I list that I'm currently traveling on my resume? Certain applications, for example Michigan's, ask me to explicitly state on my resume what I'm doing now, which is living overseas in Asia (I'm from the U.S.), traveling, blogging, and filling out law school apps. I don't really know where to list this, since I'm not working or even volunteering at the moment.

Any advice is helpful.

Thanks.
Hi there. It is hard to say without seeing your resume, but one option could be in your Interests/Personal section. Applicants often identify travel in that section and as long as it works well, you have some flexibility in formatting/what you say in there. Again, we can't really give advice without knowing what your resume looks like, but I could see something about currently living in _______ in a parenthetical in a bullet point where you talk about travel. Depending on what the blogging is/how extensive it is, that could potentially be another angle or at least worth mentioning. You always want what you are currently doing on your resume so it looks fresh/updated. Good luck! Use your best judgment on what works.

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Re: Spivey Consulting Q&A with Adcoms from Yale, Harvard, Penn, Chicago etc.

Post by JaymeMcKellop » Mon Oct 15, 2018 10:07 pm

BetterCallDonna wrote:
Sat Oct 13, 2018 2:50 pm
Hi Spivey team,

I'm currently deciding between two PS to submit to Northwestern. One only tangentially relates to law and is more of a story of self-reflection, and the other deals more specifically with why law and why Northwestern. Should I submit the more personal PS and write a one page addendum about why law and why Northwestern (since Northwestern seems to stress talking about professional goals and why Northwestern), or should I just submit the more straight-forward PS with a paragraph talking about why Northwestern at the end? If its relevant, I'm a J-KD.

Thanks!
This is unfortunately not a question we can answer without reading these personal statements and knowing what your file looks like. Ideally, you'd find some way to combine the personal PS/story of self-reflection with something that discusses your professional goals. The Why Northwestern may not be quite as important in this case given that you have an opportunity to interview and they can use the interview as a way to learn why you are interested in Northwestern. Since I can't answer this question, I'll give you a few general pointers. More personal/self-reflective personal statements tend to be better and more interesting. For K-JDs, it often is more important to be able to articulate clear professional goals. There are times where a why law addendum can be the right choice, but there are often ways that you can work this into a personal statement (even when the topic is something else entirely/not why law). And remember for Northwestern you do have two text box questions on the app where you get to discuss your short- and long-term career goals. Sorry we can't be of more help, but I'd just think carefully about what you feel best represents you and what you are going to feel the best about submitting--try not to get too caught up in what you think a law school wants to hear and think about what best conveys what you want to tell them about yourself. Good luck!

HYSnumbers+
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Re: Spivey Consulting Q&A with Adcoms from Yale, Harvard, Penn, Chicago etc.

Post by HYSnumbers+ » Tue Oct 16, 2018 11:23 am

Every time I look at the LSAT and GPA medians for Yale and Harvard I've wondered this. I don't know if this is information you guys have or if you do if you'd be willing to share it, but I was wondering if you knew or have estimated how many people with 173 or higher LSAT scores also have very high GPAs (like 3.9+). I know the standard rough estimator for most schools is if you're above both medians you have a pretty good chance of getting in, but I've also heard that is not the case for the very top schools. At the same time though, there are probably less than 2000 173+ scores applying this cycle (I think). What percentage of those people do you think have 3.9+?

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ThaBlackLord
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Re: Spivey Consulting Q&A with Adcoms from Yale, Harvard, Penn, Chicago etc.

Post by ThaBlackLord » Wed Oct 17, 2018 11:10 pm

Hey Spivey team,

I got a few questions. If my mentor attended the school I want to go to should I have her write me a recommendation or give a call to the admissions? When is the optimal time to apply for a URM (AA male) this cycle?

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SD_Spivey_Consulting
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Re: Spivey Consulting Q&A with Adcoms from Yale, Harvard, Penn, Chicago etc.

Post by SD_Spivey_Consulting » Fri Oct 19, 2018 12:22 pm

HYSnumbers+ wrote:
Tue Oct 16, 2018 11:23 am
Every time I look at the LSAT and GPA medians for Yale and Harvard I've wondered this. I don't know if this is information you guys have or if you do if you'd be willing to share it, but I was wondering if you knew or have estimated how many people with 173 or higher LSAT scores also have very high GPAs (like 3.9+). I know the standard rough estimator for most schools is if you're above both medians you have a pretty good chance of getting in, but I've also heard that is not the case for the very top schools. At the same time though, there are probably less than 2000 173+ scores applying this cycle (I think). What percentage of those people do you think have 3.9+?
Wouldn't we all love to know this!? Unfortunately, that specific data is not made available to the public. There is some data out there, however, that those most curious can access through LSAC's Data Library which also links to data provided by the ABA. You can find the number of people who received a certain LSAT score (about 1,000 had a 173+ last cycle), but you cannot see how many also had a particular GPA or how many of those applied, were admitted to, or enrolled at a particular school. ABA disclosures will show you the apps/admits/matrics at each school in total, but not broken down into groups of LSAT, GPA, or a combination of the two.

Another place you could look for the data you're interested in is through LSAC's Official Guide to ABA Law Schools. If you click on a particular school and then scroll down to the bottom of the page, some schools will actually provide the number of apps/admits within various ranges of LSAT and GPA, in order to give applicants an idea of the chance of admission at that school for people with similar stats as them. An example is https://officialguide.lsac.org/Release/ ... Law School. It's the school's choice whether or not to provide this data and while I have not looked through all the law school's pages, top ranked law schools do not typically provide this information. In any case, if you're into data, these resources are the best available to the public.

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SD_Spivey_Consulting
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Re: Spivey Consulting Q&A with Adcoms from Yale, Harvard, Penn, Chicago etc.

Post by SD_Spivey_Consulting » Fri Oct 19, 2018 12:35 pm

ThaBlackLord wrote:
Wed Oct 17, 2018 11:10 pm
Hey Spivey team,

I got a few questions. If my mentor attended the school I want to go to should I have her write me a recommendation or give a call to the admissions? When is the optimal time to apply for a URM (AA male) this cycle?
Hello! If your mentor can share some helpful information about you, such as traits you have that would be useful in law school (analytical ability, writing and research skills, logical reasoning, etc.) then it could make for a good letter, but I would also make sure you have at least one academic reference and/or a professional reference on file as well. Definitely make sure that the recommendation is in writing. If you don't want your mentor to be one of your official LORs, then have her send an email to admissions directly and write that she wanted to put in a good reference for you. That way, it's not one you've requested to be part of your app, but it will end up in your file to be read along with your formal application documents.

As for when the optimal time to apply for you is, well, it's no different than anyone else's. Our https://blog.spiveyconsulting.com/its-e ... ecent blog discusses what's early, normal and late. One thing that is a bit different is that some URM groups tend to apply a little later in the cycle and therefore, tend to get admit offers later in the cycle. If you're someone that the committee wants to admit and they still have room, they'll admit you, but we cannot say there is any "optimal" time for a particular ethnic group to apply.

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ThaBlackLord
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Re: Spivey Consulting Q&A with Adcoms from Yale, Harvard, Penn, Chicago etc.

Post by ThaBlackLord » Fri Oct 19, 2018 4:36 pm

SD_Spivey_Consulting wrote:
Fri Oct 19, 2018 12:35 pm
ThaBlackLord wrote:
Wed Oct 17, 2018 11:10 pm
Hey Spivey team,

I got a few questions. If my mentor attended the school I want to go to should I have her write me a recommendation or give a call to the admissions? When is the optimal time to apply for a URM (AA male) this cycle?
Hello! If your mentor can share some helpful information about you, such as traits you have that would be useful in law school (analytical ability, writing and research skills, logical reasoning, etc.) then it could make for a good letter, but I would also make sure you have at least one academic reference and/or a professional reference on file as well. Definitely make sure that the recommendation is in writing. If you don't want your mentor to be one of your official LORs, then have her send an email to admissions directly and write that she wanted to put in a good reference for you. That way, it's not one you've requested to be part of your app, but it will end up in your file to be read along with your formal application documents.

As for when the optimal time to apply for you is, well, it's no different than anyone else's. Our https://blog.spiveyconsulting.com/its-e ... ecent blog discusses what's early, normal and late. One thing that is a bit different is that some URM groups tend to apply a little later in the cycle and therefore, tend to get admit offers later in the cycle. If you're someone that the committee wants to admit and they still have room, they'll admit you, but we cannot say there is any "optimal" time for a particular ethnic group to apply.
Once again, thank you so much for having taken the time to answer my questions!

mjw958wn
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Re: Spivey Consulting Q&A with Adcoms from Yale, Harvard, Penn, Chicago etc.

Post by mjw958wn » Fri Oct 19, 2018 8:24 pm

Hi Spivey Team,

Yale's instructions for the résumé state: "Unless you have a significant number of publications, the Admissions Committee prefers résumés to be no longer than one page."

What would you advise a non-traditional (10+ yrs out of college) who has a potentially 2-page-long résumé not from a long publications list but from the sheer number of post-college jobs plus 2 grad degrees?

Thank you!

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