Gray’s Guide to Government Honors Programs

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Gray
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Gray’s Guide to Government Honors Programs

Post by Gray » Tue Aug 14, 2018 4:38 pm

If you want to work for the government, you’ve probably already read all about the terrible odds, hiring freezes, slow interviewing process and other sources of misery that come with applying to the honors programs. But if you have a real passion for public service (or a passion for not being in the office at 10pm), the effort is definitely worth it.

This guide is for anyone who is currently working on Honors applications, but also for 1Ls and 2Ls thinking about what they should be doing earlier on. I’ll go over what agencies are looking for, what to put in your cover letter, the interview process, the selection timelines, and security clearances. This is based mostly on my own experiences (I got to the final round at 3 agencies + DOJ), but also from conversations with friends about theirs.

Basics
Honors programs are 2 or 3 year entry level appointments at federal agencies. Honors programs are typically only open to graduating 3Ls, current clerks, or those currently in a qualifying fellowship (which apparently includes other 2-year honors programs, at least at DOJ). You also need to be a U.S. citizen.

The programs usually involve rotations through different practice areas within the agency, and the attorney usually has some say about which ones. Honors programs are known to be quite competitive—most of the non-DOJ agencies hire only 2-5 people per year, if that. DOJ’s is obviously the biggest, but you apply to specific components which individually accept very few people. DOJ’s is also the most competitive, AFAIK. I’m not going to try to list them all, because there are a lot. But if you google [agency] + “honors attorney” you should be able to figure out if they have an active program.

Before Applications Open
If you’re a 1L or 2L, the time to start thinking about applications is now--because now is the time to load up your resume with a range of relevant gold stars. Fed gov agencies don’t necessarily care about ~prestige~ extracurriculars (DOJ does love moot court and main journal though). What they want to see is someone who is involved in their community, and can juggle multiple competing priorities. Why? My guess is that, because working for the government will sometimes mean doing some boring tasks that are not in your job description and handling requests from a bunch of different people at the same time, they want to find people who willingly sacrifice their time to be part of something they care about.

Be ~involved~
Unlike big law or clerkships, where one or two gold stars (moot court and journal, usually) are the key, I think more is more with respect to extracurriculars in government hiring. Obviously don’t overextend to the detriment of your grades, but take on as many opportunities as you can--particularly leadership positions and things related to writing (like publishing a paper, short form writing, or legal writing TA). No matter where you end up, good teamwork skills and good legal research and writing skills will be important, so you can’t go wrong.

Get decent grades
Grades are less important to government than for clerking, but many still have a desired grade minimum (I think DHS has a 3.5 cutoff).Obviously they will look at grades, but my point is that they will probably take a 3.4 with a really well rounded resume over a 3.9 with next to no relevant experiences. LinkedIn stalking might be informative for specific agency questions, but unless they publish a cutoff, there’s no reason not to apply.

Have a life (but say no to drugs)
This goes for every job, but you need to have something that you do for fun to talk about when you get asked “what are your hobbies” in an interview. I got this question every time. If your answer is “dicking around a law student forum in the cold dark corners of the library” then you need to reevaluate your life. It can be cooking or walking your dog, but just have something non-creepy to say.

Obviously you wouldn’t mention it in an interview, but also avoid hobbies that include doing drugs (including prescription drugs that aren’t prescribed to you, or pot, even if it is legal in your state). Many programs have some security clearance requirement, and you don’t want to get all the way to the end of it and find out that you are ineligible.

Make Professor Friends
You will need 3 references, and in some cases letters of recommendation. Get a head start on this by becoming best friends with a few of the profs you liked the most. Go to their office hours with (genuine) questions about law things. Ask about their kids, or the conference they spoke at, or whatever. Find some other people who like them and take them out for lunch. Whatever you do, try to make a connection that goes beyond “this student did a very good job in my class.” You want a couple of people who be excited to pick up the phone to talk about how great you are—people who will be able to talk about how you are personable and easy to work with, engaged in what is going on around you, and how badly you want to work for the government. If the person happens to have worked at an agency (or the DOJ division) you are interested in, so much the better—but don’t try to force a connection with someone you don’t actually like. It will come across as obviously phony.

Internships and summer jobs
First of all, you can definitely do a big law summer if you want to. It probably won’t make it harder to get into an honors program. I did this, and while I declined my big law offer right away (it was extremely not for me), for most people it’s a great safety net (NALP makes the firm hold jobs open until like the end of March). That said, it will help to try to intern or extern at a related agency at some point before honors hiring starts. It gives you the opportunity to work on relevant issues, and it gives you a point of reference in interviews/cover letters (i.e. “I worked at the DOX and I enjoyed A, B, and C about that experience.”)

Deciding Where to Apply
For some, like me, this was the easy part. I had a relatively narrow area of interest, and there were several agencies with HPs that fit into my area. I was interested in government broadly, but not so broadly that I was about to apply to every HP out there. If your only goal is ‘cushy fedgov gig,’ it might be tempting to blanket every honors program with applications, but I would caution against doing that. Unless you can point to a compelling reason that you care about the agency’s mission, and have demonstrated interest through your experiences, your chances are slim--even with really strong credentials from a top school.

Keeping in mind that each honors program requires a tailored cover letter (more on that below), you should apply to every agency that you can plausibly claim to have a deep and abiding desire to work for.

Applications
Before you start firing off applications, read the instructions and deadlines VERY CAREFULLY. Fucking up at this stage could end your application. Do not forget to attach something they ask for. Do not give them a cover letter when they ask for a personal statement. Do not send them the wrong resume. Do not send a writing sample that is too long. Do not send your application late.

Update your Resume

There’s really not much to say about resumes that hasn’t been said elsewhere. Include everything relevant, shamelessly highlight your accomplishments, and don’t have any typos. IME, dates and punctuation are the easiest thing to mess up.

Cover Letters/Personal Statements
There’s a lot that could be said about this, but the most important part of the cover letter or personal statement is demonstrating that you understand what the agency is all about, and that you have a genuine interest in working there.

There are a ton of ways to do this, but the most important thing is carefully tailoring the letter to the stated mission of the agency. This means that you are unlikely to be successful by recycling the same cover letter and switching out key phrases. Structuring your letter around the mission of the agency, or the key qualities listed in their job description will go a long way towards showing that you are detail oriented, thoughtful, and genuinely want to work for them.

You also need to demonstrate a commitment to public service. The easiest way to do this is talking about a public interest or government internship. Using keywords like “mission-driven environment” and “working in a team to accomplish the [insert agency mission]” or even “serving my country”signal that you are really interested in being a civil servant.

Finally, you need to use your cover letter to showcase your writing. You might need to submit a writing sample as well, but your cover letter is probably the first exposure to your writing that the hiring committee will get. Perfect the ever loving fuck out of it. I don’t just mean avoiding typos or weird phrasing. It should be a clean, well structured argument for why they should hire you. You should have a roadmap, strong transitions, and, to the extent possible, you should support assertions with examples. If you aren’t sure where to start, ask your career services office if they have examples of successful letters.

DOJ App
Full disclosure, I almost didn’t apply to DOJ. I submitted an app at like 11:45pm the night it was due (they do not have rolling apps). There were a total of 3 open positions (not components, positions) that I was interested in, and had basically 0 chance at one of them. So I didn’t dedicate the time to the app that I should have, and this really shouldn’t be your only source of information. That said, I did get an interview, so I’m not totally useless.

Anyway the DOJ app is weird. You enter a ton of information manually (like grades for every class you have taken at law school), need to enter extracurriculars and honors, and it takes like 50 years to finish navigating through their system (which sometimes just craps out and deletes everything you hadn’t saved). You also have to select the components you are applying to and rank them. There is a whole thing about rankings (like if you don’t rank some divisions first, you have 0 chance) but IDK that much about that. Someone should really just do a DOJ honors guide, tbh.

Anyway, the main difference though is that DOJ asks the same two questions every year:
  • (1) If you could tell the selecting official one thing about yourself, what would it be?
    And
    (2) Why do you want to work for the Department of Justice and what attracts you to the components you selected?
Both have short character limits. The second one can almost be treated as a regular cover letter. The first one is hard. Most people don’t have like ONE THING that makes them more employable. I struggled to think of something and eventually wrote about how being a legal writing TA had improved my research and writing a lot. As I mentioned though, apps are NOT rolling for DOJ, so there is no incentive to apply ASAP. Take your time with the essays, and try to think of something interesting for question (1).

Writing Sample
Again, there is not much I can say that hasn’t already been said. Try to pick a writing sample that is relevant, but it’s better to have a more recent, better edited sample than something that happens to be related to the work of the agency. Mine was an excerpt from a bench memo that had NOTHING do to with the agencies I was applying to. But it was the most recent, most advanced legal writing I had, and I had edited it really thoroughly. Pay attention to page limits, and include a cover page that explains what you have cut from the original. If your school has a writing center or someone in the careers office who can look at your writing sample, take advantage of that.

Interviews
Once you have submitted your application, you will probably not hear anything for a month or more. I applied really early for the job that I eventually got, and I actually received an automated email telling me I was no longer under consideration more than a month after I applied. I got a screener 2 weeks later. It’s a slow process.

Some agencies have screeners and in person interviews, some have phone interviews before in person, and some jump right into the in person. The formats vary a bit, but the screeners are usually one or 2 people, and the in person interviews are usually a panel of 3-5 people in a small conference room.

A lot of the questions are about why you want to work there, but you should also expect behavioural questions (what would you do if you had 3 people all asking you to do something different by the end of the day?) and experiential questions (tell me about a time that you resolved a conflict.) It’s helpful to write down a few note about anecdotes that make you look good. Have something prepared for leadership, multitasking, resolving conflicts, a time that you failed, a time you handled stress, etc. It’s also good to have prepared answers to the predictable softballs, like what’s your biggest weakness (I had a good spin on this one once—“what would your subordinates criticize about your leadership style.”) Above all, you should have a solid, prepared answer for the “why do you want to work here” question. It should touch on the agency’s mission, and on the structure of the particular honors program.

You should also prepare questions. You can ask about training, the structure of rotations (if this isn’t clear from the public info), whether honors attorneys typically continue after their initial appointment, whether there is a lot of inter or intra agency collaboration, what the interviewers’ favorite thing about working there is—the usual stuff.

If you make it to the next round, your interviewers will almost definitely be different people, but it’s probably better not to spew the same thing word for word to the callback interviewers, since they’ve probably read the notes from the first round. This goes for your answers as well as your questions for them.

Offers
Offers start trickling in starting early November, and continue until March or so. Most of the time they are made by phone call, but some agencies do it by email, and occasionally offers are made in the final interview. Unlike biglaw, you will not have a month to make up your mind. I had two weeks to decide, and I think that is pretty common. Don’t be afraid to ask for more time if you are also waiting for another offer, but don’t expect to get it.

If you don’t hear back when other people start hearing back, don’t fall into a pit of despair! Although some agencies do offers in batches, some just do it on a rolling basis, so timing might have to do with when you were interviewed. DOJ, for example makes some offers in mid november, but some people designated “finalists” don’t hear back until February. The bottom line is not to lose hope until you are rejected.

Security Clearances
Last but not least, you might have to go through a security clearance process. My only advice here is to be thorough and to do it as fast as you can, and BE HONEST. Why be honest if they’ll never find out, you ask? Because one of the most common reasons a clearance is denied is lying on your forms. If you haven’t smoked pot in 5 years, but the forms are asking about drug use, just admit to it. I know people who smoked a lot of pot in high school who have TS-SCIs. I know more than one person who admitted to having done acid and got a TS-SCI. I also know people who had offers rescinded because they failed to disclose very minor drug use. As long as there is some distance, it’s not going to be a problem for you. And if there is a polygraph involved, you’ll be glad you didn’t lie on your forms.

Why do it as fast as you can? Because the process is really fucking slow, and the sooner they get your forms, the sooner you get cleared. Make sure to follow up if you haven’t heard anything in a while. Paperwork sometimes gets lost in the vast bureaucracy, and if they forget about you for six months, the entire process is delayed.

***

I hope that helps! Feel free to post here or PM me if you have any questions about any of this.

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Re: Gray’s Guide to Government Honors Programs

Post by Nony » Thu Aug 16, 2018 8:26 am

I also got my federal job through an honors program (and applied to a bunch more), and I think Gray's whole post is awesome. I just added a few things below that I wanted to emphasize.
Gray wrote:
Tue Aug 14, 2018 4:38 pm
Basics
Honors programs are 2 or 3 year entry level appointments at federal agencies. Honors programs are typically only open to graduating 3Ls, current clerks, or those currently in a qualifying fellowship (which apparently includes other 2-year honors programs, at least at DOJ). You also need to be a U.S. citizen.
Keep in mind that although the 2-3 year term is very common, a number of agencies do offer permanent positions through the Honors program (others with the 2-3 year term expect to convert the Honors position to a permanent position at the end of the term, although that's not guaranteed). Also, you cannot have worked full time after graduation at all - so if you're currently a clerk but you worked for a firm for a year first, you're ineligible to apply. (This is worth keeping in mind if you're a 1L/2L plotting out your timeline.)
Before Applications Open
If you’re a 1L or 2L, the time to start thinking about applications is now--because now is the time to load up your resume with a range of relevant gold stars. Fed gov agencies don’t necessarily care about ~prestige~ extracurriculars (DOJ does love moot court and main journal though). What they want to see is someone who is involved in their community, and can juggle multiple competing priorities. Why? My guess is that, because working for the government will sometimes mean doing some boring tasks that are not in your job description and handling requests from a bunch of different people at the same time, they want to find people who willingly sacrifice their time to be part of something they care about.

Be ~involved~
Unlike big law or clerkships, where one or two gold stars (moot court and journal, usually) are the key, I think more is more with respect to extracurriculars in government hiring. Obviously don’t overextend to the detriment of your grades, but take on as many opportunities as you can--particularly leadership positions and things related to writing (like publishing a paper, short form writing, or legal writing TA). No matter where you end up, good teamwork skills and good legal research and writing skills will be important, so you can’t go wrong.
I *absolutely* agree with all this. In fact, although the hiring process for a lot of these programs is a bit of a black box, I got the sense that for many agencies, the more *things* you had on your resume, the more likely you were to make it to an interview (I got interviews with programs for which I didn't have a lot of pertinent experience but I had a number of the boxes ticked - clerkships, LR, moot court, internships, clinic, etc.). I don't think you should make law school only about collecting brass rings for the sake of the brass rings, but I do think you should make the most of any opportunities you have, especially as you can use them to develop skills/knowledge pertinent to a government position (so for instance a clinic that gets you into court would be valuable for any litigating position, even if it's in a different practice area. That kind of thing).
Internships and summer jobs
First of all, you can definitely do a big law summer if you want to. It probably won’t make it harder to get into an honors program. I did this, and while I declined my big law offer right away (it was extremely not for me), for most people it’s a great safety net (NALP makes the firm hold jobs open until like the end of March). That said, it will help to try to intern or extern at a related agency at some point before honors hiring starts. It gives you the opportunity to work on relevant issues, and it gives you a point of reference in interviews/cover letters (i.e. “I worked at the DOX and I enjoyed A, B, and C about that experience.”)
Yes, I worked for a firm my 2L summer as well (regional big-ish law, but I think the same general principle applies). I do think that for DOJ, if you can do SLIP your 2L summer, it helps - there is such a thing as a funnel offer where former SLIP interns get offered a permanent position to return (although these have become much rarer than they used to be). Even in the absence of a formal offer, having previous experience with the agency you're applying to helps. But you may be able to split your summer with a firm and SLIP - it's been done in the past.

I do have some anecdotal info suggesting that something like ENRD (Environment and Natural Resources Division) of DOJ would prefer to see a PI summer over going to a firm, but I think that's a bit of an exception. Otherwise it doesn't seem to pose a problem, except to the extent it eliminates an opportunity to show dedication to public service and/or get relevant experience (and for some programs biglaw might even be reasonably relevant).
Deciding Where to Apply
If your only goal is ‘cushy fedgov gig,’ it might be tempting to blanket every honors program with applications, but I would caution against doing that. Unless you can point to a compelling reason that you care about the agency’s mission, and have demonstrated interest through your experiences, your chances are slim--even with really strong credentials from a top school.
Absolutely this. Although I was a little surprised at getting interviews where I didn't think I had super pertinent experience, I also did not get interviews at places where my resume showed a total lack of involvement in anything related to the agency's mission (primarily the financial regulators).

I see (especially) 0Ls (but also law students) saying that they want a "bigfed" job or to "work for DOJ" and from inside the government, this doesn't make a lot of sense, mostly b/c no one really defines "bigfed" very specifically. SEC is very different from DOJ which is very different from DHS. Even within DOJ, ENRD is very different from the USAOs which are very different from EOIR which is very different from Tax which are all very different from BOP. And from the DOJ end (where you submit one application that goes to a number of hiring components), it's going to be almost impossible to craft an application that makes you equally appealing to each of those components. So I think people interested in government work do need to think about what exactly that means to them and which agencies really offer that. You don't have to have this figured out before you start law school - you can use law school to find out - but you have to be able to articulate why that agency when the time to apply comes around.
DOJ App
I think everything Gray said about this is correct, and it is a weird process (I think it is the most "black box" of all the agencies). A few things to add:

- DOJ really likes clerkships. This may be less so for EOIR (b/c so many of its positions are clerkships, for an immigration judge), but clerking really helps, a lot.
- the application does take ages to fill out.
- do take the essays REALLY SERIOUSLY. You don't submit a cover letter, so this is your one chance to show that you can write and to make a compelling case for your candidacy. Hiring components do read these carefully and take them seriously.
- the ranking thing: you apply to DOJ, but there are a bunch of different hiring components, and you pick three to submit to (you can also submit to any components hiring "informally" on top of this. As far as I can tell, these are components that would like to have access to the applicants but don't want to go through the centralized hiring process/lock themselves into a certain number of positions or timeline. They're not guaranteed to hire). This actually makes some sense, given the points above about having pertinent experience and a dedication to agency mission (you are unlikely to have the same degree of relevant experience/dedication to, say, an ALJ clerkship with DEA and with the civil rights division).

You also have to rank the three components, and yes, there is a fair amount of scuttlebutt suggesting that certain divisions won't be interested in you if you don't rank them first. I got hired by the component that I ranked last, so it's certainly not a hard and fast rule. I have heard rumors that Crim and Civil Rights only hire people who rank them first. (But Civil Rights is probably one of the most selective components out there, so your chances with them are tough to begin with.)

Personally I think that trying to game the rankings gets too complicated and you should rank them honestly, because that will be more consistent with your overall application anyway. And I think it's too hard to get reliable info on who you need to rank first. But reasonable minds could differ on that, and if you hear from someone actually in a given component that you have to rank it first, that's probably worth paying attention to.
Some agencies have screeners and in person interviews, some have phone interviews before in person, and some jump right into the in person. The formats vary a bit, but the screeners are usually one or 2 people, and the in person interviews are usually a panel of 3-5 people in a small conference room.
If you're not in DC (I wasn't), DOJ will either pay to transport you to DC, or for some positions, to another pertinent city (USAOs interview at their offices; I think if you're interviewing for an IJ clerkship with EOIR, they'll send you to an immigration court nearby you, which might be DC, and interviews for EOIR GC are in DC). The travel arrangements are a bit of a pain in the ass and feel free to recheck and reconfirm with the OARM people or the people you're interviewing with (OARM sent me an interview schedule and flight info, then they sent me updated/changed flight info, and they also changed the interview schedule, but didn't tell me that part! I found out when I e-mailed the interviewers to confirm and they were like uhhhh your interview is 3 hours earlier than that??). You pay upfront and get reimbursed, and it will take a while.

Other programs will do phone interviews or video interviews. Some only do one round of interviews (and it may not be in person); some do two rounds and will fly you to DC (or wherever) for the final round.
Above all, you should have a solid, prepared answer for the “why do you want to work here” question. It should touch on the agency’s mission, and on the structure of the particular honors program.
Definitely this. Why public service, why federal public service, why this specific agency.
Offers
Offers start trickling in starting early November, and continue until March or so. Most of the time they are made by phone call, but some agencies do it by email, and occasionally offers are made in the final interview. Unlike biglaw, you will not have a month to make up your mind. I had two weeks to decide, and I think that is pretty common. Don’t be afraid to ask for more time if you are also waiting for another offer, but don’t expect to get it.
DOJ gives you very little time to decide and most people accept their offers on the spot. I negotiated for time to call my husband (not like we hadn't already talked about it and he was fine with me accepting, I just wanted to be able to talk to him first). If you have a particular reason to need more time, I agree, feel free to ask for it, but yeah, you might not get it. (But ask anyway - they're not going to get so pissed they rescind your offer or anything silly like that.)
Security Clearances
Also absolutely completely agree about not lying on this, especially about drug use. Minor use will not screw you over, but lying definitely will. The background check does in fact involve interviews with people from your past, including but not limited to people you list on the background check, so you can't be sure what they'll dig up. FWIW, I was told that the only per se bars to passing were post-bar drug use, failure to pay taxes, and defaulting on student loans.

Speaking purely personally, the thing that's a little weird about starting as an Honors attorney is that generally you have very little to no practice experience and are entering an office where anyone who wasn't hired as an Honors attorney (i.e. most people) had to have relevant experience to get hired. So it can be a little daunting always feeling like you're playing catch up. That said, if the office hires Honors attorneys, they have made a commitment to training newbies, so go in with the mindset that you're going to learn, you're going to reach out to people and get as much formal/informal training as you cana. Also, there will be plenty of people who don't really know/care what the Honors program is, but some people will see it as proof that you're "smart," and I've definitely run into people who also entered through the Honors program who have been big supporters.

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Re: Gray’s Guide to Government Honors Programs

Post by Hey_Everybody » Thu Aug 16, 2018 8:47 am

This is probably a stupid question, but there's no such thing as an honors program for federal public defenders, is there?

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Re: Gray’s Guide to Government Honors Programs

Post by Nony » Thu Aug 16, 2018 9:46 am

Not a stupid question, but not that I’ve ever seen, I’m afraid. (I do know of at least one person who was hired to the FPD out of a clerkship but I think usually they prefer to hire people with decent experience. Most that I’ve seen were local PDs first.)

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Re: Gray’s Guide to Government Honors Programs

Post by Gray » Thu Aug 16, 2018 9:59 am

ILU Nony!! TY for the additions!!

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Re: Gray’s Guide to Government Honors Programs

Post by Hey_Everybody » Thu Aug 16, 2018 10:19 am

Nony wrote:
Thu Aug 16, 2018 9:46 am
Not a stupid question, but not that I’ve ever seen, I’m afraid. (I do know of at least one person who was hired to the FPD out of a clerkship but I think usually they prefer to hire people with decent experience. Most that I’ve seen were local PDs first.)
Ok yeah, that's what I thought. Thanks!

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Re: Gray’s Guide to Government Honors Programs

Post by Nony » Thu Aug 16, 2018 10:20 am

Gray wrote:
Thu Aug 16, 2018 9:59 am
ILU Nony!! TY for the additions!!
No, no, thank you for writing it!

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Re: Gray’s Guide to Government Honors Programs

Post by Spartan626 » Tue Sep 11, 2018 1:02 am

Great post. Could have used this a few years back when I started law school. :lol: Somehow I did not even hear about Honors programs until Spring of my 3L year.

I was selected for an honors program and start this fall with my agency (after my clerkship ends). Pretty excited.

Gray and Nony both posted great information. I will add a couple quick points that I hope will be helpful.

1) Resume - Your resume will be different than one that you send to law firms. Resumes for federal positions should be more like a CV, you will put more detailed (relevant) information about what you did in previous jobs/internships/clerkships. If you look at federal job postings on USAjobs, they all pretty much tell you that a resume has to show you have the required experience in detail. Hard to do this in one or two pages. This may not matter much for many people coming straight out of law school, but for someone like me who had several years of post-undergrad work (military in my case), it is important to show what you did.

2) The hiring process can be long. At least one agency hires on a rolling basis as positions open up in their regional offices. After being "qualified" for my agency's program in December, I did not hear anything else until early summer, when I suddenly had interviews with several regional offices. The interview types can be anything and I had phone, Skype (extremely awkward, never want to do that again), and was interviewed in person at two offices. I received multiple offers (including from one office that just interviewed me over the phone). The different offices were very understanding in regards to me waiting to accept until I heard back from the other offices, and I suspect that there was a lot of behind-the-scenes coordination for both the interviews and offers. They really seemed to want to ensure I was a good fit and had a fair chance to choose the office I wanted. After I accepted the "unofficial offer", the background check to "official" offer took about two months.

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Re: Gray’s Guide to Government Honors Programs

Post by Emily » Wed Jan 02, 2019 3:18 am

I don’t know anyone who specialized in copyright work right out of law school. If on the lit side, there is just so much more patent lit than trademark or copyright lit. It seems like the small number of lawyers who focus on copyright and trademark work did so later in their career. That being said, most of the ip litigators I know get occasional trademark and copyright work.

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Re: Gray’s Guide to Government Honors Programs

Post by UVA2B » Wed Jan 02, 2019 4:49 am

Emily wrote:
Wed Jan 02, 2019 3:18 am
I don’t know anyone who specialized in copyright work right out of law school. If on the lit side, there is just so much more patent lit than trademark or copyright lit. It seems like the small number of lawyers who focus on copyright and trademark work did so later in their career. That being said, most of the ip litigators I know get occasional trademark and copyright work.
This is irrelevant to the thread. Stay on topic please.

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