50 Market Survey (Secondary Market Advice Compilation)

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Re: 50 Market Survey (Secondary Market Advice Compilation)

Post by UVA2B » Tue Apr 24, 2018 9:46 am

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Re: 50 Market Survey (Secondary Market Advice Compilation)

Post by UVA2B » Tue Apr 24, 2018 9:46 am

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Re: 50 Market Survey (Secondary Market Advice Compilation)

Post by Woodford » Thu May 10, 2018 11:41 am

I'll take a crack at Dallas. Caveat: This is also a jumping off point, feel free to talk me down if I am wrong.

Rather than try to break the market up into a bunch of tiers, I'll organize it this way: 1. National firms 2. Texas Biglaw 3. BigTex firms

I. National firms: Over the past three decades, Dallas has come to be dominated by a number of national satellites (not to the extent that Houston has, but that might change in coming years). All of these firms pay Cravath scale (Jones Day might be Cravath-ish). Of the national firms, I would say that GDC and Sidley are the most well-regarded. Jones Day is right below them, and Winston & Strawn is the wild card. All have sophisticated work, but the work at Gibson and Sidley is probably marginally better than the other two. Partnership prospects at all of these firms are slim to non-existent.
Gibson, Dunn Crutcher: Strongest corporate shop of the national firms, largest deals. Supposedly a decent place to work, but they have some interesting personalities.
Sidley Austin: Raided Weil to create a foothold a few years ago. Seem to be pretty evenly split between lit and corporate, and offer high quality work. Has more of a satellite feel than GDC, but plenty or organic work.
Jones Day: Seems to be on the down slide, office size has decreased by about a third over the past five years. Heard poor things about the culture, but they are pretty busy.
Winston & Strawn: Opened up at the beginning of last year, snagged a ton of high profile litigators from Fish & Richardson, Jones Day, and a few of the BigTex shops. Most litigation-focused of all of the national firms in town. They have a smattering of PE and Tax people they brought over, corporate work seems to be an afterthought for now.
Akin Gump: AG started in Dallas, but D.C. is the crown jewel now and Dallas has been relegated to satellite status. Don't seem to be as busy as the other firms, decreased in size over the last decade, but their bankruptcy and commercial litigation practices are still well regarded.
Weil: Shadow of its former self, focuses mostly on PE now, fairly busy.
There are other national firms in town, including Holland & Knight, K&L Gates, Polsinelli, Baker McKenzie, etc., but they are all much smaller than the above listed firms. I don't know much about any of them individually, they don't hire very many associates, but I know that some of them are well regarded for niche practices (Baker McKenzie's tax group)

II. Texas BigLaw: The Texas Big Three all factor into the Dallas legal landscape, although NRF seems less busy than the other two. All three are very much satellites to their Houston offices and a lot of their work originates in the main office. Haynes and Boone is the largest OG Dallas firm. I'm including Thompson and Knight and Locke Lord into this category as well. All of these firms have national reach, but they handle more middle market deals/matters than the national satellites, They all pay at/near market, but my understanding is that Cravath bonuses are reserved for exceptional billing, and there is a range for those just hitting their targets. Partnership prospects are marginally better than the national satellites, especially at places like HayBoo and T&K that are headquartered in Dallas.
V&E: Very strong corporate practice, but known for having a weird office culture (supposedly similar to BB Houston) and some difficult personalities.
Baker Botts: Their corporate department has been raided lately, and I'm not sure how busy they are, but I believe their litigation practice groups are well regarded. The people seem great, but I have heard the partners are very much into the stuffy old Dallas, Highland Park scene that turns some people off. Doesn't seem true of the associates.
NRF: In a similar situation to BB, their office seems to be becoming more dependent on Houston for work. I have heard good things about the people and the hours.
Haynes and Boone: Very strong reputation in Dallas. Solid mid-market corporate group, but they handle some larger deals as well. Their real estate group seems very busy, and they have a large lit department with a diversity of practice areas. I have heard good things about the culture, but their reputation as a "lifestyle" firm is a relic of years past. The hours are on par with the other big Texas firms.
Thompson & Knight: They are the most O&G-centric of the Dallas firms. They have diversified, and all of their practice groups are well regarded, but energy work is still king. Good culture.
Locke Lord: Well regarded litigation firm with a peculiar culture. I have heard the hours can be brutal.
Gardere and Andrews Kurth fit in here as well, but I don't know how their recent mergers will change their Dallas offices.

III. BigTex: All of these firms are more regional than the firms listed above. The work is almost exclusively middle market. They all pay market or close to it for first-years, but the scale is usually compressed and the bonuses are smaller. Partnerships prospects are better.
Jackson Walker: Great culture. Probably the largest, most respected of the BigTex Dallas firms. Their corporate work isn't all that sophisticated, but they handle a lot of PE and real estate transactions. Solid lit group. The knock on JW is that there are remnants of a "good, old boy" culture.
Winstead: Another of the old-line Dallas firms. They are slightly smaller than JW, but their corporate and finance practices are well regarded.
Strasburger: Once upon a time they were a major player in Dallas, but their office is undergoing quite a few changes, including a merger. Handle a lot of insurance work. I have heard that they have some strong personalities.
Within this tier, there are a lot of firms like Carrington Coleman, Wick Phillips, and Munsch Hardt that might be classified as Midlaw by most definitions, but they are well regarded locally.

There are also a number of strong litigation boutiques in town. Susman Godfrey closed its Dallas office two years ago, but McKool Smith, Figari & Davenport; Lynn, Pinker, Cox (or whatever they are now), and Reid Collins are all very good, and pay well.

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Re: 50 Market Survey (Secondary Market Advice Compilation)

Post by SmokeytheBear » Thu May 10, 2018 12:02 pm

This is excellent.

I think you can amend my thread to include Orange County and Los Angeles. I think the correct groupings in California are SF/SV, LA/OC, and San Diego. LA and OC are distinct markets, but I think those of us who talk about LA have enough experience with OC to talk about it as well. And a couple people who contribute to that thread work in OC (or worked in OC).

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Re: 50 Market Survey (Secondary Market Advice Compilation)

Post by minnbills » Thu May 10, 2018 1:23 pm

I'm happy to share some knowledge about Minneapolis.

A brief primer on the market: The State of Minnesota enjoys a robust and diversified economy. The excellent quality of life in the land of lakes, coupled with the presence of three law schools in the state, has resulted in an over-saturated market in which entry-level positions for lawyers are fiercely competitive. Further, students who leave the state to pursue law degrees with T14 schools often come back to MN within a few years of graduating.

There is a large federal bench in the state, with 3 8th Circuit Judges (Straas, Murphy, and Loken), 12 District Court Judges, 9 Magistrate Judges, and 5 Bankruptcy Judges calling MN home. Accordingly, there are strong opportunities for federal clerkships here. Likewise, the MN Court of Appeals typically hires about 30 clerks per year, and the MN Supreme Court hires maybe 10-15 clerks.

Large MN firms generally operate on a low-cost business model, as opposed to true biglaw firms located on the coasts. This means that while starting salaries may appear commensurate with what a junior associate can make in NYC or another large market, there is very little salary growth after the first year. Thus, a senior associate at a market-paying firm in MN may only make about 200k per year. Typical yearly salary increases are in the range of 0K (seriously) to 5k per year. However, the low cost of living and strong exit options because of the sheer number of corporations located in MN makes the market an attractive option nonetheless.

Partners at the largest firms in MN may make about 500k per year, while partners at the remainder of these firms are probably bringing in between 250-350/yr depending on the practice area and seniority. However, the low cost of living, excellent public schools, and lower hours than what you find in NYC/Chi make partnership at one of these firms a great landing spot.

Law Schools: There are three law schools in Minnesota: (1) The University of Minnesota; (2) Mitchell Hamline School of Law; and (3) the University of St. Thomas. UMN is by far the highest ranked, usually bouncing between 20-25 in the US News rankings. UMN dominates the market, which a majority of large firm and clerkship placements each year going to UMN grads. UMN enjoys some national reach, with a small percentage of students placing into large firms and federal clerkships across the country. Mitchell Hamline is the product of a merger between William Mitchell School of Law (which produced Chief Justice Berger) and Hamline School of Law. Though not highly-ranked, Mitchell Hamline has a robust and active alumni network in the state, and enjoys strong placement into smaller firms and state-level clerkships. UST opened its doors about 15 years ago, but has carved out a space for itself in the market. Backed up by a strong business school, UST routinely places some high-ranking students into prestigious jobs in Minnesota.

Large/Prestigious firms:

1) Greene Espel. The highest paying and most-prestigious firm in the state is Greene Espel. GE is a boutique mostly-litigation firm which employs maybe 50 lawyers. With starting salaries at 180k, GE sets the market and positions are highly competitive, usually going to 8th Circuit Clerks.

2) Jones Day. Jones Day, Nights, and Weekends opened its Minneapolis office two years ago by poaching several partners from other prominent Twin Cities firms. Jones Day has quickly established itself as a litigation powerhouse in the state, boasts 30 lawyers in MN, and is the second-highest paying firm with starting salaries at 160k. The firm has hired as many as 5 federal clerks per year since it opened, with these hires comprising almost the totality of junior-level hiring. The firm boasts former US Attorney Andrew Luger as a partner.

3) Dorsey & Whitney, and Faegre Baker Daniels. These two firms were historically the two powerhouses in the MN legal field. Dorsey famously produced Justice Harry Blackmun, the primary author of Roe V. Wade, and counts Senator Amy Klobuchar and former Governor Tim Pawlenty as alumni. Former Vice President Walter Mondale is currently a partner at the firm. Dorsey enjoys a nationally prominent M&A practice and has consistently delivered one of the highest deal volumes of any firm in the country. Dorsey's New York office has grown to about 100 lawyers in recent years. Dorsey is known to be actively seeking another large firm in the U.S. to merge with.

The law firm of Faegre Baker Daniels is the largest firm in MN, and enjoys strong practice groups across the firm. Faegre is a product of a merger between indianapolis based Baker Daniels and the old Minneapolis firm of Faegre & Benson. Now, Faegre boasts particularly strong corporate and restructuring groups, and has a nationally-prominent financial services litigation team. Faegre is known to service some of the strongest hedge funds in the midwest. Both Dorsey and Faegre have offices across the U.S. and increasingly across the world. Junior associates at either firm can expect starting salaries of 140k (might be up to 160k shortly) and long hours. Both firms typically hire 5-10 summer associates per year in Minneapolis, and actively recruit laterals from coastal biglaw firms.

All of the following may be more appropriately described as midlaw

4) Robins Kaplan. The law firm of Robins Kaplan is a large litigation-focused firm. With a reputation as a mini quinn emanuel, Robins associates can expect starting salaries of 140k and a sink-or-swim environment. Robins boasts one of the strongest IP litigation teams in the country. Robins typically hires 5-10 summer associates per year. Known to be a hostile environment with a lot of churn.

5) IP-only Firms. Fish and Richardson, Patterson Thuente, Carlson Caspers, and Merchant and Gould are all boutique IP firms. Prospective associates should know that these firms generally offer higher compensation packages than non-IP firms.

6) Winthrop & Weinstein. "Fratty" is an appropriate description of the culture at this firm. Honestly, I don't like almost everyone I know who works there. Winthrop is known as a strong litigation firm with an active presence in the agribusiness space. Winthrop pays 160k and is a sink-or-swim environment.

7) Stinson Leonard Street. The product of the merger of the Minneapolis firm of Leonard Street and Deinard, and the Stinson firm of Kansas City, Stinson is a strong regional firm with some offices on the coasts. Stinson boasts a strong corporate department and pays 140k to first years. Stinson tends to hire 3-5 summer associates per year.

8) Fredrikson & Byron. "Where law and business meet," Fredrikson has staked itself out as a strong business-oriented full service law firm headquartered in Minneapolis. Fredrikson boasts one of the strongest litigation teams in the state, has a strong presence in the oil & gas field, and also features the only large debtor-side bankruptcy practice in the United States west of Chicago. Fredrikson frequently hires laterals from biglaw firms on the coasts and has been expanding aggressively in recent years. Starting salaries of 140k and strong partnership prospects make this an attractive firm for young attorneys. 3-5 summer associates positions per year.

9) Briggs & Morgan. Briggs is a regional firm with a strong litigation presence in MN. Several former MN Supreme Court Justices reside in the litigation department. The firm has a "fratty" reputation and is known to have some outsized personalities among its partnership ranks. The firm has a strong construction and real estate practice. Starting salaries at 140k and 2-5 summer associates per year.

10) Gray Plant Mooty Mooty & Bennett. GPM is a first-rate, if a bit on the small side, law firm that boasts one of the strongest franchise practice groups in the U.S. GPM is known to grow conservatively and offers some of the best entry-level experience available in the state of MN. The firm has a genteel culture and is known as a great place to work. Starting salaries at 130k and 2-5 summer associate hires per year.

11) Maslon. Formerly "Maslon Edelman Borman & Brand," Maslon began as the "jewish" firm in MN back when it was difficult for jewish lawyers to find employment with large firms. (Seriously.) Maslon rebranded in recent years and enjoys an excellent reputation as a small-ish firm with first-rate lawyers. The firm has a professorial culture, boasts one of the strongest litigation teams in the midwest and heavily recruits laterals from coastal biglaw firms. Starting salaries at 130k (might be 120k) and 1-3 summer associates per year.

12) Fox Rothschild. The Philadelphia-based firm of Fox Rothschild moved into the MN market when it acquired the venerable Minneapolis firm of Oppenheimer, Wolff and Donnelly. Since then, the Minneapolis Office of FR has grown conservatively and hires maybe 1-3 summer associates per year.

13) Ballard Spahr. Ballard moved into Minneapolis with the acquisition of the venerable firm of Lindquist & Vennum, which boasted former MN Supreme Court Justice (and pro football hall of famer) Alan Page amongst its illustrious alumni. Ballard is rumored to have chosen Lindquist solely for its strong M&A group Now, not surprisingly, the Minneapolis office of Ballard Spahr is home to one of the top M&A practices in the midwest. Like Fox Rothschild, since its merger Ballard has grown conservatively. Starting salaries at 130k and maybe 1-3 summer associates a year.

14) Larkin Hoffman. Located in the suburb of Bloomington, Larkin has staked itself out as a low-cost but high performing firm with a focus on corporate work. Starting salary below market but a great work-life balance.

Other firms of note:
-Anthony Ostlund Baer & Louwagie (high octane litigation boutique);
-DLA Piper. (Recently moved into the market and has grown to about 10 lawyers. The firm recently poached the strongest restructuring partner in the state, Michael Fisco, and has an active corporate group);
-Best & Flanagan (venerable MN firm with some strong partners, like Tom Heffelfinger, former US Att'y.);
-Barnes & Thornburg (strong litigation and restructuring practice, pays less than market);
-Ciresi Conlin (recently formed by Michael Ciresi, former name partner at Robins Kaplan. Small firm but one of the strongest litigation teams in the cities.)

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Re: 50 Market Survey (Secondary Market Advice Compilation)

Post by UVA2B » Thu May 10, 2018 11:00 pm

Thank you for the recent entries! I will update soon, and I am going to attribute your posts to you unless you don’t want to field questions about the market you’re familiar with! Please let me know if you don’t want to field questions about your markets in the future.

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Re: 50 Market Survey (Secondary Market Advice Compilation)

Post by UVA2B » Fri May 11, 2018 10:14 pm

I've updated the recent entries, and changed the poster attributable to that guide so you can be quoted if people have specific questions about your market. Thank you sincerely for all of your effort!

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Re: 50 Market Survey (Secondary Market Advice Compilation)

Post by UVA2B » Fri May 11, 2018 10:20 pm

SmokeytheBear wrote:
Thu May 10, 2018 12:02 pm
This is excellent.

I think you can amend my thread to include Orange County and Los Angeles. I think the correct groupings in California are SF/SV, LA/OC, and San Diego. LA and OC are distinct markets, but I think those of us who talk about LA have enough experience with OC to talk about it as well. And a couple people who contribute to that thread work in OC (or worked in OC).
I've updated to reflect that the LA thread is LA/OC, but I'm going to wait until we get someone familiar with SD to create a separate guide for SD before we draw those distinctions. In the meantime, I would at least be ready for SD questions to come your way as the closest proxy for Southern California Biglaw. But you can always let them know you're not as familiar with SD as a market if they're trying to parse between the strength of the Cooley office vs. the MoFo or Latham office, or how Mintz Levin or Gunderson should be compared to the big players in SD, etc.

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Re: 50 Market Survey (Secondary Market Advice Compilation)

Post by SmokeytheBear » Fri May 11, 2018 10:29 pm

UVA2B wrote:
Fri May 11, 2018 10:20 pm
SmokeytheBear wrote:
Thu May 10, 2018 12:02 pm
This is excellent.

I think you can amend my thread to include Orange County and Los Angeles. I think the correct groupings in California are SF/SV, LA/OC, and San Diego. LA and OC are distinct markets, but I think those of us who talk about LA have enough experience with OC to talk about it as well. And a couple people who contribute to that thread work in OC (or worked in OC).
I've updated to reflect that the LA thread is LA/OC, but I'm going to wait until we get someone familiar with SD to create a separate guide for SD before we draw those distinctions. In the meantime, I would at least be ready for SD questions to come your way as the closest proxy for Southern California Biglaw. But you can always let them know you're not as familiar with SD as a market if they're trying to parse between the strength of the Cooley office vs. the MoFo or Latham office, or how Mintz Levin or Gunderson should be compared to the big players in SD, etc.
Yup

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Re: 50 Market Survey (Secondary Market Advice Compilation)

Post by 50MarketSurveyAnon » Sat May 12, 2018 9:27 pm

Johannes wrote:
Tue Apr 24, 2018 9:39 am
Chicago/Illinois

Caveat: This is a jumping off point, people should feel welcome to push back on certain points and correct anything I don't know what I'm talking about.

Biglaw Firms
Kirkland - the leader of the pack and considered most prestigious firm in the city. Have established practice areas in basically anything and everything. They've got litigators that encompass the entire spectrum: commercial, securities, IP, etc. Private equity is their bread and butter, including fund formation and capital markets. They also have established more traditional M&A corporate practices. They seem to hire a lot of Chicago and Northwestern students through OCI and then will fill in gaps with a very active lateral hiring market that is experience focused and will consider those with good experience from less prestigious backgrounds.

Skadden - Chicago leader in tax work. Also very built out real estate capital markets group.
OCI hiring pretty prestige driven, so lots of UChicago grads.

Moving into the middle tier of Winston, McDermott Will & Emery, Sidley, and Mayer Brown.
Winston is a very traditional, old school firm. Fine top to bottom, but I think they stand out in their litigation. They want to be pretty prestige focused in hiring but probably have to dip to some schools they would not otherwise prefer to for the right candidates (e.g., Illinois, Ohio State, etc.)
MWE: People here bill a lot. They've got a really great tax practice that includes international tax planning and state and local controversy. They also have a fine corporate M&A group. I don't think they are too prestige focused in hiring and will hire the right candidate regardless of school if wow-ed.
Sidley: They do a lot of things well and are probably the most complete firm here in this tier. They have strangleholds on some niche litigations, niche tax groups, good corporate group etc. They are pretty old school/white shoe and prefer to hire from the prestigious law schools.
Mayer Brown: this is what I would consider the first Chicago blue collar law firm listed. They hire from all the schools in the city and state if you excel with grades/law review. They do a lot of debt finance/collateralization work, which is a pretty niche type of work that does not lead to many exit options but can make you an above average player in the firm. They also have an alright tax group that does everything from deal support to the corporate and above mentioned debt finance work, federal controversy, and some transfer pricing planning.

The last tier of big firms Baker McKenzie, Morgan Lewis, DLA Piper, Katten, Jones Day etc. All of these firms, generally (consult Chambers and Partners because they all have some niches with huge rainmakers) are characterized by doing lower margin work that other firms don't really care about doing/clients won't pay top dollar for including employee/labor employment; lower stakes litigation; generic corporate work etc. They hire from all law schools (if the right grades and fit) and across the entire midwest region.

Not market paying big firms:
Lots of litigation work that represent insurers in everything from run of the mill insurance defense to subrogation etc. Johnson Bell, Hinshaw Culbertson, Schiff Hardin, etc.

Best Personal Injury Firms
Chicago is the birthplace of the best PI firms because of the infamous Cook County jury (that until recently gave the largest awards)
Clifford is the poster boy, but he has spun off several proteges at this point that have done the same including his most famous Corboy and Demetrio

If I were to be very general in what all of these firms are looking for I think Skadden and Kirkland are looking for prestigious educations and smart people. They don't care about ties because their model doesn't need people to stick around. All of the other firms are sensitive to ties and want to know why Chicago and want people that will try and cut it there for an entire career.

Obviously the litigation firms (PI and non-market) are most focused on real litigation/trial experience and do not care about any prestige oriented credentials. They hire a lot from the state's attorney/DA offices.
I disagree with KE: Chicago not being ties sensitive. I was told my someone at the firm with very good reason to know (don't want to out myself but this individual would absolutely know) that if I were to interview there I needed to make my ties to Chicago very clear. (We'll say I'm at a non-UChicago non-Northwestern T-10)

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Re: 50 Market Survey (Secondary Market Advice Compilation)

Post by UVA2B » Sat May 12, 2018 9:54 pm

I can’t speak for johannes here, but there is actually a difference between “cares about ties” and having to answer questions about your ties in an interview. It’s very possible the person you’re referring to inside KE wants you to be a strong candidate, and so they’re telling you to have a good narrative for why KE Chicago, while those hiring are making decisions mainly on prestige and grades. Those two things aren’t necessarily mutually exclusive.

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Re: 50 Market Survey (Secondary Market Advice Compilation)

Post by Johannes » Sat May 12, 2018 9:58 pm

thanks anon. valuable data point to have and ill def defer to you as you seem to have personal insight that i dont. chicago as a whole, generally is pretty ties oriented, so this makes sense and could be the current trend of Kirkland.

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Re: 50 Market Survey (Secondary Market Advice Compilation)

Post by ezrafitz » Mon Nov 12, 2018 3:13 pm

Delaware/Wilmington


The Market: While there are certainly legal jobs to be had everywhere in the State of Delaware, by far the biggest and most prominent market is Wilmington. While sometimes lumped in with the Philadelphia legal market, it really is its own entity, and takes a ton of pride in that.

First of all, the Delaware legal market is incredibly small. Bar numbers are still in the 6000s, with usually 100-200 new attorneys being admitted each year. As such, the market is incredibly collegial. Everyone knows everyone, or at least everyone respects everyone. There is an incredibly strong sense of camaraderie between Delaware attorneys, and a shared sense of disdain for attorneys from other markets who do not respect the qualities of the Delaware bar that attorneys here are proud of.

Delaware is home to a relatively unique court called the Court of Chancery. This is a Court of equity that more or less is the final say on Delaware Corporate law issues. On that note, due to the laws surrounding corporations and the comparative expertise of the bench in Delaware, corporation law is far and away the largest practice area in the state. The Court of Chancery now consists of 1 Chancellor and 6 Vice Chancellors, with a total of (I believe) 14 clerks per year. There are of course federal and bankruptcy judges here as well, but someone else may have to supplement me on the numbers.

For Wilmington specifically, there are a few types of firms that dominate the market:

First are the "Big 4", or the big boys of local Delaware legal work. These are Richards, Layton, and Finger; Morris, Nichols, Arsht, & Tunnel; Potter, Andersoon & Corroon; and Young, Conaway, Stargatt, & Taylor. As all cases filed in Delaware are required to have Delaware barred attorneys on them, these four firms tend to do large amounts of work in conjunction with other firms in other markets. Given the responsibility that the Delaware bench puts on "local" counsel, these firms do far more than just sign their name. They take great pride in the role they play in cases, and have their hands deep in all of the work product that flows through them. These firms tend to pay near market base salaries, with varying bonuses.

Next are the Plaintiffs' firms. These are firms such as Grant & Eisenhoffer, and Abrams & Bayliss. These firms are often filled with former Big 4 attorneys and other high profile attorneys and judges from within Delaware. They files huge numbers of Plaintiffs' cases in Delaware, and are highly regarded for this work.

There are also the "Biglaw" shops set up in Delaware. The largest such office is Skadden Wilmington. With nearly 70 attorneys, it is the largest non-Big 4 office in Wilmington. The work at Skadden tends to be a mix of doing work in conjunction with other Skadden offices, and handling cases entirely through the Wilmington office. In contrast to the Big 4, Skadden Wilmington does not do work for the same client in conjunction with other firms in other markets, instead working solo for clients, and often in conjunction with other Skadden offices.

Other such shops include firms such as Duane Morris, DLA Piper, Reed Smith, and others. Often these shops have anywhere from 5-25 attorneys, working as a local hub for larger offices in other cities. Many Biglaw shops in Delaware pay full market salary and bonus.

There are of course other types of firms, such as personal injury and family law. Given the huge emphasis on corporation, bankruptcy, and securities law in Delaware, these practice areas are not as prominent. I also have limited experience with them, so again, someone can feel free to supplement this in any way with further information.

Law schools:

The primary law school in Delaware is the Delaware Law School at Widener University. A huge number of attorneys in Delaware come from this school, as many of its graduates stay in the state to practice. There are also many attorneys from nearby Pennsylvania schools, such as Penn, Temple, Villanova, and Drexel. There are transplants from further out, but these more local schools tend to dominate the market. Similarly, many attorneys in Delaware are local, being either from Delaware or a nearby state.

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