Smokey’s Guide to Biglaw Summer Associate

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SmokeytheBear
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Smokey’s Guide to Biglaw Summer Associate

Post by SmokeytheBear » Mon May 07, 2018 1:34 pm

Many of you will be starting your summer associate positions (“SAs”) at firms in the coming week or two. Congratulations. In many ways this is the brass ring—you have in your hand what you’ve been working for since college.

This guide and the ensuing Q & A is meant to be a resource for those of you going this route. I will provide several key things that you should know going into the process. Then feel free to answer questions. I will provide answers with the caveat that my responses are based on my experience in Los Angeles, working corporate, as an upper mid-level. Hopefully my comrades from other markets and practice groups will also be able to answer questions.

The overall theme of this guide is to make you somewhat forgettable to those who you have worked for. For the vast majority of the firms, if you are an SA, it means that the job offer that you hope to get at the end of the summer is yours to lose. What that means is that when we as a recruiting committee sit down to finalize offers, we don’t so much figure out who to give offers to, we figure out if there is anyone who we should not give offers to. This guide is meant as a cheat sheet for you so that you don’t do things that would make you negatively memorable enough to us such that we want to no offer you.

In no particular order:


1. Attire

Hopefully one of my female colleagues can chime in on this for women.

For men, the first day you need to wear a suit. Just something simple. Dark gray, charcoal, but preferably navy blue. White shirt. Simple tie. Do not come in looking like an optical illusion with a striped shirt and wavy tie, or checkered shirt with a striped tie. White shirt, basic pattern tie. Simple lace up shoes (save your Chelsea boots, monk straps, loafers, or Italian no lace slip ons for other occasions). The first day is not that day that you want to make a fashion statement. Remember—be forgettable.

After the first day just feel it out. If it looks like all of the men wear slacks and shirts, then that’s what you wear after. Just because a few mid-levels are wearing chinos and polos does not mean that you should. If it looks like many men wear chinos or khakis and a shirt, maybe think about doing that after the second week. But give it some time to figure out what people wear. Many offices in California do casual on Friday, which means you can wear jeans, polos, and maybe boat shoes or deck shoes. I would say still wear your normal Monday through Thursday attire your first Friday just to see what everyone else does.

Beards are fine in California, and they seem fine elsewhere (not sure about Texas). But don’t decide to grow a beard during your SA. And if you do have a beard, keep it trimmed and shave your neck (please).

2. Lunches and meetings

Lunches are one of the more important parts of your summer. With all luck, you’ll be getting taken out to lunch four days a week. But while lunches are important, so is doing work. So, for example, if you are on a client call or in a meeting with an attorney and it’s 11:55 and you have a noon lunch date, DO NOT JUST LEAVE THE MEETING. Simply email the attorney who you were supposed to go to lunch with and say that you are stuck in a meeting and that you cannot make lunch. The attorney with whom you were on the call will likely need to grab lunch when the call is over anyway. This might be the most attorney-like thing you do all summer—bail on lunches because calls went long.

I would say one of the only times that it might be reasonable to leave a meeting for a lunch is when the lunch is with an important partner and the meeting is with a low level associate. If the meeting starts at 11, be an adult about this and simply say to the associate, “Hey, Associate Amy Adams. Partner Daniel Day Lewis asked me to lunch today at noon. Do you have a sense of how long this meeting might go, as I feel as if it is important that I make lunch with him.”

If you miss the lunch, well, you have a few options. If you have an assigned mentor, you could send them an email after the meeting is over and say, “hey I was in this awesome meeting with Associate Elizabeth Olsen and I missed lunch. Did you grab lunch or do you know anyone else who needs lunch?” You could also email the admin in charge of summers and ask them the same. My suggestion would be to just go get a lunch yourself. Don’t come across as the person who is always looking to get free stuff from the firm and maximize every lunch possibility.

Also, do not drink at lunches, even if an associate or partner is. They might have just closed a deal or settled a case and want to celebrate. When lunch is over, they can go back to their office and read the Times. You, however, might go back to the office and need to meet with a partner or associate about a new deal/case. You don't want a beer on your breath.

3. Don't be egregiously awkward--offer to pay for a few beers

That transitions well into my next point, which is be a stud/dame and offer to pay for things on occasion. 99.999999% of the time, you will be rebuffed.

To clarify some confusion, let me explain what I mean. This is about OPTICS.

Do not offer to pay for a tab when it's a firm sponsored event.

Do not offer to pay for a tab when there are 20 people there and you order 20 shots and a Bud Light. That's awkward--obviously the firm is getting the tab.

Never insist on paying for something. Never say, "no please let me get this." That's also awkward.

For pure optics--purely to show associates and partners that you do not expect them/the firm to pay for EVERYTHING; purely to show them that you are not entitled; purely not to come across as a spoiled brat; purely to show that you're a reasonable person who hasn't forgotten how to pay for things. This is an example of scenario where you should offer to pay (but, again, 99.999999% of the time an attorney will say, "oh I got it, put your wallet away"):

(1) You’re at a ballgame and you’re in line to get a beer with one or two associates an the cashier says “ok that’ll be $55.” The summer should simply make a gesture for their pocket or wallet to show that they are willing to pay. As I said, 99.9999% or the time it will get paid for by an associate.

(2) You and two associates are at a bar after having gone to a firm event and

(i) you're sitting at a table and you realize there is no table service. You say, "I'll go get us a round--what do you guys want?" or;

(ii) you're standing at the bar and the three of you order drinks and the bartender says, "that'll be $45." Don't stand there and not do anything. Just go for your wallet. Again, 99.9999% of the time one of the attorneys also hear the bartender and get their card out.

If the summer happens to pay for the tab, it's not the end of the world. This cannot and will not look bad for the summer. I am saying this because I have been in countless scenarios where this happens and a summer says, "hey do you want to get this?" Listen, I get that the firm will likely pay me back, but I also get that the summer is making a butt load of money and if they pay for a tab, it's not the end of the world. The summer's aversion to paying for a $45 tab when they are making several thousand dollars a week to go to lunches just looks really cheap, awkward, inelegant, and almost rude.

The point of this is for the summer not to come across as entitled brats. Of course they should expect a massive bar tab to be covered. But the optics of offering to pay for just a couple beers builds currency.

This might be a west coast vs. east coast thing. This might be my public school, wipe my own ass background.

Conversely, if you’re out at a bar or café or something and associate Jonah Hill says “hey why don’t you grab us a dozen cookies at the counter,” do not say, “sure, great, can I have your card?” No no no no.

4. Be nice

The staff are the backbone of the firm and they can help you in more ways than I care to explain right now. While they are the staff, they are not the help. Be kind to them. Just treat them like you treat everyone else. Know their names. Say thank you. Don’t dismiss them while you are talking to attorneys. Be as kind to them as you are to the attorneys.

5. Hookers and blow

Hopefully this goes without saying, but don’t bring a prostitute to firm events.

Also hopefully this goes without saying, but don’t do any illegal drugs at firm events or with attorneys. Remember, this is a 10 week interview.

6. Pen and paper

For more work related stuff, always carry and pen and paper with you when you are outside of your office (except if you are going to lunch). You never know when an attorney might ask you to do something or you might have to write something down. Plus if someone sees you with a pen and paper, it will make you look prepared and like you are ready to work.

Never walk into an attorneys office without a pen and paper.

7. ALWAYS RUN REDLINES

I really should have put this as the first thing because this is probably one of the things that pisses attorneys off the most.

A redline (also called a blackline) is when you have an original copy of a document (doc A), you make changes to that document (doc B), and you put doc A and doc B into a program that produces a new document that shows what changes were made. THIS IS NOT TRACK CHANGES, but it looks kind of similar.

In corporate, many attorneys only look at redlines. It can be tricky to read them at first, like reading the matrix, but you get used to it after a while and it becomes the only way you read things.

So if an attorney asks you to draft a certificate and sends you precedent from which to base it, when you send them the completed certificate back, you should send them the clean certificate and a redline showing the changes from the certificate that you drafted and the original certificate that they sent you.

8. Go to the events

The summer schedule can be demanding, with events every other Saturday, impromptu happy hours, and scheduled events a couple of work nights a week. It’s a lot. You don’t need to go to all of them, but you need to go to most of them. I know of SAs who have been no offered because they did not make an effort to go to events. It shows you don’t care about the life of the firm.

That said, life happens. Especially at the age many of you will be, you’ll have weddings to go to and such. That’s fine. Just let the staff SA coordinator know well in advance.

Point is—go to the events. Let your significant other know that this will be a 10 week period where you’re going to have many obligations, day and night. And you just gotta do it.

------

Ok. Please ask questions.

*edited for lunch time drinking.
*edited for paying for things. reasonable people can differ on this, but I know I'm not the only person who thinks this and manners are important to me, so I'm standing firm on this.
Last edited by SmokeytheBear on Tue May 08, 2018 6:05 pm, edited 7 times in total.

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Re: Smokey’s Guide to Biglaw Summer Associate

Post by UVA2B » Mon May 07, 2018 1:40 pm

Stickied, as it should be. This is great.

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Re: Smokey’s Guide to Biglaw Summer Associate

Post by urmlaw18 » Mon May 07, 2018 1:46 pm

Great read. Thank you.

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Re: Smokey’s Guide to Biglaw Summer Associate

Post by notlegaladvice » Mon May 07, 2018 5:14 pm

SmokeytheBear wrote:
Mon May 07, 2018 1:34 pm
4. Be nice

The staff are the backbone of the firm and they can help you in more ways than I care to explain right now. While they are the staff, they are not the help. Be kind to them. Just treat them like you treat everyone else. Know their names. Say thank you. Don’t dismiss them while you are talking to attorneys. Be as kind to them as you are to the attorneys.
Quoting this for emphasis because it seems so obvious and yet for some people it's not. It is SUCH A BAD LOOK to be disrespectful to support staff. Secretaries/practice assistants and paralegals; e-discovery folks; cleaning crew and "hospitality"/events people; recruiters; IT; HR -- all of these people are deserving of your utmost respect. They (for the most part) will be nice to you, and it's not hard to be nice to them.

I recall a summer from my class who worked on the Hill before LS and thought he was hot shit. On one occasion, he was openly disrespectful/dismissive to his secretary in front of other summers and an attorney, and they were all mortified. Word traveled extremely fast. People were not happy with him, but someone gave him "the talk" and he stopped being as much of an ass. It definitely still follows him around, though.

Another nice guide, Smokey.

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Re: Smokey’s Guide to Biglaw Summer Associate

Post by pneumonia » Mon May 07, 2018 6:06 pm

SmokeytheBear wrote:
Mon May 07, 2018 1:34 pm

3. Paying for things

That transitions well into my next point, which is be a stud/dame and offer to pay for things on occasion. 99.999999% of the time, you will be rebuffed. But you just want to come across as not trying to be a free loader. At a bar with a partner or an associate and the tab comes? Get your wallet out and say “let me get this.” They will not let you get it, but you will look like a champ.

Conversely, if you’re out at a bar or café or something and associate Jonah Hill says “hey why don’t you grab us a dozen cookies at the counter,” do not say, “sure, great, can I have your card?” No no no no.
I agree that you should avoid coming across as a freeloader, but it's worth clarifying that you generally SHOULD NOT be offering to pay for lunches or for anything at scheduled summer-associate events. Everyone knows the firm is paying for these, and if you try to pay you look (a) like you don't know what's going on, (b) like you're trying to pull a power move, or (c) both. I think its appropriate to offer to pay once or twice if you're at a decidedly "unofficial" event—e.g., the firm takes you to a baseball game but afterwards you're invited to grab a beer with a smaller group—but in most cases even then the partner or associate will be submitting a reimbursement request to the summer program.

SmokeytheBear wrote:
Mon May 07, 2018 1:34 pm
Beards are fine in California, and they seem fine elsewhere (not sure about Texas). But don’t decide to grow a beard during your SA. And if you do have a beard, keep it trimmed and shave your neck (please).
This is also true in Texas—it's ok to HAVE a beard, but it's somewhat looked down upon to GROW a beard during your SA.

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Re: Smokey’s Guide to Biglaw Summer Associate

Post by SmokeytheBear » Mon May 07, 2018 6:17 pm

pneumonia wrote:
Mon May 07, 2018 6:06 pm
SmokeytheBear wrote:
Mon May 07, 2018 1:34 pm

3. Paying for things

That transitions well into my next point, which is be a stud/dame and offer to pay for things on occasion. 99.999999% of the time, you will be rebuffed. But you just want to come across as not trying to be a free loader. At a bar with a partner or an associate and the tab comes? Get your wallet out and say “let me get this.” They will not let you get it, but you will look like a champ.

Conversely, if you’re out at a bar or café or something and associate Jonah Hill says “hey why don’t you grab us a dozen cookies at the counter,” do not say, “sure, great, can I have your card?” No no no no.
I agree that you should avoid coming across as a freeloader, but it's worth clarifying that you generally SHOULD NOT be offering to pay for lunches or for anything at scheduled summer-associate events. Everyone knows the firm is paying for these, and if you try to pay you look (a) like you don't know what's going on, (b) like you're trying to pull a power move, or (c) both. I think its appropriate to offer to pay once or twice if you're at a decidedly "unofficial" event—e.g., the firm takes you to a baseball game but afterwards you're invited to grab a beer with a smaller group—but in most cases even then the partner or associate will be submitting a reimbursement request to the summer program.
Yeah I wasn't meaning lunches, but rather the exact situation you said. You're at an after event at a bar with a couple of people and a tab for a few drinks comes. Not an official event or an event with 15 people.

The general idea is that 80% of the time when an associate or partner gets the tab, it will be submitted for reimbursement, so the associate or partner doesn't care about getting the tab. My point was mostly just making the gesture in a situation in which no harm can be done, but it will look good.

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Re: Smokey’s Guide to Biglaw Summer Associate

Post by BearCat » Tue May 08, 2018 3:19 pm

I never offered to pay for the group or anything in that situation, but I always moved to pay for myself until it was obvious that an associate was offering to pick up the bill.

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Re: Smokey’s Guide to Biglaw Summer Associate

Post by riot » Tue May 08, 2018 3:30 pm

Something important about work:

Don’t go out of your way to do as much work as you possibly can. No one will be impressed that you billed 200 hours. It’s more important to do a really good job on the work that is assigned to you. This means no typos, substance as good as you can get it, and assignments turned in on time. If it looks like you aren’t going to be able to finish something by the deadline, let the attorney who assigned it to you know as soon as possible. No one is going to remember you for billing a ton, but they will remember it if your work product really sucked, was late, or that you sucked at communicating. That’s the type of work product issue that people get no-offered for.

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Re: Smokey’s Guide to Biglaw Summer Associate

Post by BigZuck » Tue May 08, 2018 4:06 pm

I couldn't disagree more about offering to pay for stuff but honestly the thought of a Summer even being in a position that them paying for something would even be a remote possibility is kind of blowing my mind so maybe this is one of those YMMV (the concept, not the poster) things or I'm just misunderstanding the hypo.

If you're a Summer and you're at some bar afterparty the lawyers you are with will fall all over themselves to grab the check, if only because you being there means that stuff will be reimbursed by the firm (aka free for them). And at least at my firm an associate would probably getting a talking to by recruiting if it got out that a Summer paid for something. If you're a Summer definitely don't insist on paying, but honestly I can't even envision a scenario when you would have to pretend offer to pay.

Motion to strike number 3 from the sticky because I think it's doing more harm than good. TYIA.

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Re: Smokey’s Guide to Biglaw Summer Associate

Post by SmokeytheBear » Tue May 08, 2018 4:26 pm

I think you guys are misunderstanding what I’m saying.

I never said anything about insisting on paying. I was focused on the optics of offering to pay.

I know that in the vast vast majority of situations associates will pay for things and get reimbursed. What I am talking about is making a gesture for pure optics.

I’m not saying a summer should offer to pay when there are 20 people there and you order 20 shots and a Bud Light. I’m not saying a summer should insist on paying or even say “no no let me get this.”

What I am saying is exactly what I said before. You’re at a ballgame and you’re in line to get a beer with one or two associates an the cashier says “ok that’ll be $55.” The summer should simply make a gesture for their pocket or wallet to show that they are willing to pay. As I said, 99.9999% or the time it will get paid for by an associate. But This shows that they don’t come across as entitled brats. Of course they should expect a massive bar tab to be covered. But the optics of offering to pay for just a couple beers when there isn’t a tab going is a moment that shows that they aren’t entitled and they aren’t brats.

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Re: Smokey’s Guide to Biglaw Summer Associate

Post by beep » Tue May 08, 2018 5:45 pm

I wouldn't think twice either direction re: summer offering to pay or not offering to pay unless they make it egregiously awkward in either direction. Not that "make a small gesture to signal you are not entitled" is bad advice, but I don't see how this is remotely important enough to merit mentioning in an 8-item list about how to act as an SA (and as the longest item in the list at that). The more important advice buried in that entry is "don't be egregiously awkward."

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Re: Smokey’s Guide to Biglaw Summer Associate

Post by SmokeytheBear » Tue May 08, 2018 5:53 pm

beep wrote:
Tue May 08, 2018 5:45 pm
I wouldn't think twice either direction re: summer offering to pay or not offering to pay unless they make it egregiously awkward in either direction. Not that "make a small gesture to signal you are not entitled" is bad advice, but I don't see how this is remotely important enough to merit mentioning in an 8-item list about how to act as an SA (and as the longest item in the list at that). The more important advice buried in that entry is "don't be egregiously awkward."
Fair enough. Agree to disagree. I do think you have better titled it "don't be egregiously awkward" and I will amend my item above to highlight that--thank you.

Again, my pointers were simply items that I think are important so as not to stand out--to be forgettable. It's all too easy for summers to come across as entitled (and for attorneys to come across as entitled during the summer, as well). So when a summer shirks an easy opportunity not to come across as entitled, it makes the summer stand out in my mind.

But this is clearly an item where reasonable attorneys can disagree, so for any summers reading this, take notice.

edit: you edited your post after I responded, so I need to edit my post as well. The reason it is the longest is because I had to lengthen the post to clarify confusion. My point stands, though.

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Re: Smokey’s Guide to Biglaw Summer Associate

Post by intro-gamer » Tue May 08, 2018 5:59 pm

Great post Smokey! Seeing how a lot of being a SA involves these firm events, I was wondering if anyone had any tips on gracefully ending a conversation with someone? I always find it awkward to just try to find something else to say to keep a conversation going, and I wonder if it would be just better to gracefully end it at that point.

Also, how do you handle someone bringing up a topic you have no interest/knowledge in (let’s say sports :? ) in a way that isn’t offputting?

I guess these questions aren’t SA specific, but definitely could use advice on this!
Last edited by intro-gamer on Tue May 08, 2018 6:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Smokey’s Guide to Biglaw Summer Associate

Post by SmokeytheBear » Tue May 08, 2018 6:00 pm

BearCat wrote:
Tue May 08, 2018 3:19 pm
I never offered to pay for the group or anything in that situation, but I always moved to pay for myself until it was obvious that an associate was offering to pick up the bill.
This is a correct deployment of the tactic that I mean.

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Re: Smokey’s Guide to Biglaw Summer Associate

Post by SmokeytheBear » Tue May 08, 2018 6:03 pm

intro-gamer wrote:
Tue May 08, 2018 5:59 pm
Seeing how a lot of being a SA involves these firm events, I was wondering if anyone had any tips on gracefully ending a conversation with someone? I always find it awkward to just try to find something else to say to keep a conversation going, and I wonder if it would be just better to gracefully end it at that point.
If it's an attorney who you don't speak with or interact with often: "Sorry, I need to find the bathroom quick, but it was great chatting with you."

If it's an attorney who you do interact with often just delete the last clause of that sentence and say you'll be right back. Chances are when you come back they'll be talking with someone else and have already forgotten about you.

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Re: Smokey’s Guide to Biglaw Summer Associate

Post by minnbills » Tue May 08, 2018 6:12 pm

BigZuck wrote:
Tue May 08, 2018 4:06 pm
I couldn't disagree more about offering to pay for stuff
This sorta ties into the general admonition that you are on a 10-week interview and should do your best not to rub anyone the wrong way.

If I'm buying drinks/lunch or whatever (out of my own pocket) for some SA and they don't at least offer to pay, it will def leave me with the impression that the SA is entitled or at least not very considerate.

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Re: Smokey’s Guide to Biglaw Summer Associate

Post by SmokeytheBear » Tue May 08, 2018 6:26 pm

riot wrote:
Tue May 08, 2018 3:30 pm
Something important about work:

Don’t go out of your way to do as much work as you possibly can. No one will be impressed that you billed 200 hours. It’s more important to do a really good job on the work that is assigned to you. This means no typos, substance as good as you can get it, and assignments turned in on time. If it looks like you aren’t going to be able to finish something by the deadline, let the attorney who assigned it to you know as soon as possible. No one is going to remember you for billing a ton, but they will remember it if your work product really sucked, was late, or that you sucked at communicating. That’s the type of work product issue that people get no-offered for.
Excellent point.

Further to his, ask when the attorney wants it done. If it's Monday and they say they need it by Friday at 3pm, it should go without saying that (i) you should not wait until Friday morning to start working on it and (ii) if you can get it completed and looking good on Wednesday, then get it to them on Wednesday.

Also, if we give you an assignment and tell you we need it by a certain time, getting us something shitty or not getting us something at all "because there was a firm event" is not an excuse.

You get a calendar that has all firm events. You should be able to plan your work flow so that you can get us good work product on time and attend firm events. While this is a 10 week long interview, you are also riding the gravy train with biscuit wheels. We're giving you work, but they are easy projects and you'll never have more than one or two things to do at once. So just be responsible with your time so you can get things done on time and enjoy the fun events and drink your face off.

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Re: Smokey’s Guide to Biglaw Summer Associate

Post by NukinFutz » Wed May 09, 2018 2:28 am

Great thread. Thanks Smokey.

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Re: Smokey’s Guide to Biglaw Summer Associate

Post by HelloYesThisIsDog » Wed May 09, 2018 2:36 am

Reading this thread makes me cringe at all the mistakes I made as a summer associate.

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Re: Smokey’s Guide to Biglaw Summer Associate

Post by LawSSS2 » Wed May 09, 2018 9:37 am

Awesome thread. Would love a female perspective on clothing, cause while I have a few years work experience, it's not in a big city and the rules are pretty lax, so I'm kinda clueless.

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Re: Smokey’s Guide to Biglaw Summer Associate

Post by SmokeytheBear » Wed May 09, 2018 10:55 am

LawSSS2 wrote:
Wed May 09, 2018 9:37 am
Awesome thread. Would love a female perspective on clothing, cause while I have a few years work experience, it's not in a big city and the rules are pretty lax, so I'm kinda clueless.
JenDarby wrote:
Wed May 09, 2018 10:29 am
Seeing if maybe I can get one of my female colleagues to chime in.

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Re: Smokey’s Guide to Biglaw Summer Associate

Post by JenDarby » Wed May 09, 2018 1:35 pm

SmokeytheBear wrote:
Wed May 09, 2018 10:55 am
LawSSS2 wrote:
Wed May 09, 2018 9:37 am
Awesome thread. Would love a female perspective on clothing, cause while I have a few years work experience, it's not in a big city and the rules are pretty lax, so I'm kinda clueless.
JenDarby wrote:
Wed May 09, 2018 10:29 am
Seeing if maybe I can get one of my female colleagues to chime in.
In NYC, you could basically wear any business/business casual clothing found at banana republic, Ann Taylor, loft, j crew, etc (all of these ALWAYS have constant coupon codes and sales) and you will blend right in. Women typically wear a skirt/pants and blouse and then maybe a sweater (really only if you get cold). Also lots and lots of shift dresses. Flats or heels are fine.

I bought two theory suits for OCI and never needed more in my 3 years in NYC, but I was corporate and did not go to court.

My best recommendation would to be to get a few skirts and blouses and then just play it by ear based on what your coworkers wear. Some places may be a little more formal or casual. By the end of my time in NYC I was wearing leggings and very casual dresses.

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Re: Smokey’s Guide to Biglaw Summer Associate

Post by LawSSS2 » Wed May 09, 2018 3:05 pm

JenDarby wrote:
Wed May 09, 2018 1:35 pm
SmokeytheBear wrote:
Wed May 09, 2018 10:55 am
LawSSS2 wrote:
Wed May 09, 2018 9:37 am
Awesome thread. Would love a female perspective on clothing, cause while I have a few years work experience, it's not in a big city and the rules are pretty lax, so I'm kinda clueless.
JenDarby wrote:
Wed May 09, 2018 10:29 am
Seeing if maybe I can get one of my female colleagues to chime in.
In NYC, you could basically wear any business/business casual clothing found at banana republic, Ann Taylor, loft, j crew, etc (all of these ALWAYS have constant coupon codes and sales) and you will blend right in. Women typically wear a skirt/pants and blouse and then maybe a sweater (really only if you get cold). Also lots and lots of shift dresses. Flats or heels are fine.

I bought two theory suits for OCI and never needed more in my 3 years in NYC, but I was corporate and did not go to court.

My best recommendation would to be to get a few skirts and blouses and then just play it by ear based on what your coworkers wear. Some places may be a little more formal or casual. By the end of my time in NYC I was wearing leggings and very casual dresses.
Straightforward, thanks! I'm not a big fan of heels...I'll wear them, but prefer not to all the time. There's no stigma if you don't?

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SmokeytheBear
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Re: Smokey’s Guide to Biglaw Summer Associate

Post by SmokeytheBear » Wed May 09, 2018 6:07 pm

LawSSS2 wrote:
Wed May 09, 2018 3:05 pm

Straightforward, thanks! I'm not a big fan of heels...I'll wear them, but prefer not to all the time. There's no stigma if you don't?
The only time I see women in my office wearing heels is if they are going to a depo or court. Otherwise it's ballet flats or tennis shoes.

LawSSS2
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Re: Smokey’s Guide to Biglaw Summer Associate

Post by LawSSS2 » Wed May 09, 2018 7:20 pm

SmokeytheBear wrote:
Wed May 09, 2018 6:07 pm
LawSSS2 wrote:
Wed May 09, 2018 3:05 pm

Straightforward, thanks! I'm not a big fan of heels...I'll wear them, but prefer not to all the time. There's no stigma if you don't?
The only time I see women in my office wearing heels is if they are going to a depo or court. Otherwise it's ballet flats or tennis shoes.
Sweeet.
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