Guide: You're an undergrad student (or in high school!) and you want to go to law school

Please post in this forum if you have any questions about law school or legal employment but have not yet entered law school.
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HelloYesThisIsDog
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Guide: You're an undergrad student (or in high school!) and you want to go to law school

Post by HelloYesThisIsDog » Tue May 01, 2018 11:39 pm

This post and thread is for users who are interested in law school but aren't sure what to do with their time before they apply to law school.

What do I need to apply to law school in the US?
A bachelor's degree in any subject from an accredited undergraduate institution, and an LSAT score (or, for some schools, a GRE score). That's it. No need to overthink this. There are no other educational prerequisites.

If you're an international student, the question of whether it's accredited is trickier and I don't know the answer, but at the very least, it should be a real place and not a diploma mill.

If you're a US student wanting a foreign legal education, bear in mind that may not at all qualify you to practice law in a US jurisdiction, and requirements can be radically different, as some countries offer a professional legal degree (typically an LL.B.) as an undergraduate course of study. Also, this guide is not tailored for you. There are too many idiosyncrasies to cover with respect to foreign legal education and requirements for admission to the bar.

But really, what should I major in?
No really, you can study ANYTHING you want. Which means, you should study what interests you! "But law interests me," you say. Well, there are indirect ways to explore that interest academically. International studies and political science often have coursework that will discuss or involve legal institutions, although they do not typically teach substance that would be similar to what you encounter in law school. If your field of study involves a lot of public policy, that may provide some exposure as well (I'm thinking majors like public policy, government, public health, etc.). Again, these are indirect and won't resemble law school or what you might learn there or how you would learn it.

I'm sure other forum members will share below their suggestions for getting exposure to law in academia as an undergraduate, so peruse those. The important thing is to at least enjoy or be interested in what you're studying. That will help you put in the effort to get good grades.

Addendum: See if your school has an undergraduate mock trial team, or start one if it does not. Mock trial is often coached by lawyers/folks with JDs, and the process can be akin to some (not all) aspects of your future legal education. You also will gain valuable public speaking skills. Anecdotally, one of my law school classmates that did undergrad mock trial was an absolute boss in law school, consistently winning each mock trial competition she participated in.

The only limitation on your undergraduate studies crops up if you want to practice patent prosecution as a lawyer (that is, appearing before the US Patent and Trademark Office and helping with patent filings). You will need a BS degree and possibly more to take the patent bar exam. There should be (if there aren't already) guides on requirements for the patent bar. See those for more detail. This is a niche area and not a requirement for many lawyers entering the profession (who don't do patent work).

Are some majors better than others?
You may wonder what field of study makes you better at law school or being a lawyer. Anything that helps you develop strong critical thinking skills and improves your writing will suffice. Good writing is definitely valued in law school and in the profession, and ironically, many lawyers are bad writers and poor communicators.

Edit: a couple of different people have attempted to quantify this by comparing LSAT scores to major. Pre-law, criminal justice, and social work tend to be near the bottom. Philosophy, classics, and math tend to be near or at the top. I don't think you should pick a major based on likelihood of succeeding on the LSAT, but it's worth considering whether your major helps you develop important critical thinking skills.

http://excessofdemocracy.com/blog/2014/ ... read-homer

http://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog ... -math.html

Anything else I can do in college to prepare for law school?
Relationships matter in your education and in any career. Networking (and networking well) will pay off in spades for years to come. That means forming key relationships with friends, colleagues, mentors, and faculty, and then nourishing those relationships as you go forward in your life.

Specifically with law school and undergrad, you should seek out faculty that you enjoy taking classes from. Take more classes from them, and develop a rapport. Go to office hours, volunteer to work with them on other projects (if possible), and make the effort to form a relationship with them.

Why? In the short-term, you will need letters of recommendation (LORs) for your law school applications, and you will want them to be high-quality and from faculty who actually know your capabilities. Picking any random professor you had a single class with is not a good idea. Best case scenario, you get a neutral letter of recommendation, which does nothing for your application, and worst case scenario, the prof may write a bad letter and put something critical in it about you. I sat on an admissions committee during my 3L year, and the bad letters really tanked applications that were "on the margin," (i.e., splitters between LSAT and GPA or low LSAT/GPA, or other issues in the app). Putting your best foot forward is important in your application, and having high quality LORs are key.

In the long-term, a faculty mentor or another mentor at the university will give you amazing advice on navigating your career and help guide you through the tricky shoals of college and into the world beyond. I think very fondly of the relationships I have with some of my undergrad professors. Some of them occurred during school, and some developed afterward as I attended volunteer and social functions as an alumnus. But they all were and are valuable to me and I find my friendships with my former professors grow in a new, wonderful way every time I see them.

Never approach networking or mentorship transactionally. That is, don't come at it with the angle of "I will give you something if you give me something." Instead, pick out potential mentors based on your genuine desire to learn from them and do interesting work with them. For example, if you can do some basic undergrad research for a professor, don't come at it because you want an LOR and think of that as your purpose for doing it. Your purpose should be that you actually find the research interesting and you like the professor. You will find the experience vastly more rewarding, you'll do a better job, and you will absolutely get an LOR out of it as a result, without having to make a case for yourself, because you've already made the case with your passion, hard work, and connection with the professor.

I'm in high school - which college should I attend to prepare for law school? Translation: will going to Harvard improve my chances of attending Harvard Law School?

The single most important factors in your application to law school are your undergrad GPA and your LSAT. There is some debate that will crop up on these forums about whether there is a difference at the margins regarding undergrad prestige between two applicants with all other factors being equal. But even if such a difference exists, it's absolutely at the margins. If you have a 3.9 GPA and a 175 LSAT, your odds of admission to a Top 6 law school are extremely good. High GPA and LSAT are the best guarantees of admission to a school of your choice.

So how should law school factor into your decision of where to go to undergrad? In my opinion, it should not be a factor at all. There are other websites, consultants, and non-profits devoted to this, but you should attend an undergraduate institution that (1) keeps your costs (and debt) low; (2) is a supportive and helpful environment that will both challenge you and help you grow; (3) provides access to educational opportunities that you deem useful. There is no perfect answer for this, and I encourage you to research the benefits of different types of schools to find the right fit for you. A large public research university will offer certain things that small public universities will not, and small private liberal arts schools will have certain benefits that public and (larger) private schools might not have. You have to weigh those costs and benefits for yourself. They won't affect your shot at law school, unless they cause something else to happen, such as your unhappiness at a particular institution undermining your grades, or a high amount of debt changing which law school you might pick because of concerns regarding more student debt.

Universities that also have a law school won't necessarily have opportunities for you to take law school classes. There is not a lot of cross-pollination usually (with some exceptions). The law schools are their own islands. Some have started to branch out to undergraduates a little bit with some upper-level interdisciplinary coursework and an occasional 100-level course, but again, these will not truly resemble law school and will not give you a leg up, other than just showing you have an interest. It won't necessarily reflect competence/aptitude or otherwise weigh in your favor. You should not make this a deciding factor into where to go to undergrad. There are far more important considerations (discussed above and elsewhere on the internet) that should take precedence.

How soon should I prepare for the LSAT?
While you're enrolled in undergrad, you should not think about the LSAT at all. The two most important factors for getting admitted to law school are your undergraduate GPA and your LSAT score. If you try to do well at both simultaneously, you are likely to undermine one for the other. There are no retakes for your undergrad GPA. In the words of Ru Paul, don't fuck it up.

Once you graduate with your best possible GPA and you've secured some employment for at least a few months (any job will do), then turn your attention to LSAT prep. Other guides on this site can address how to prep the right way.

Why are you telling me to wait on my dream of being a lawyer?
I don't want you to feel like we're crushing your dreams. But undergrad is the time for you to learn about yourself and develop a lot of skills that will serve you in law school, your career, and your life. Spending your time fixating singularly on law school will distract you from these much more important things that are critical to your development as an adult.

Take each day as it comes, and explore the world that college is opening up for you. Law school will be ready once you're ready. And you will be ready at a minimum when you graduate. Not a day sooner!
Last edited by HelloYesThisIsDog on Wed May 02, 2018 6:03 pm, edited 4 times in total.

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proteinshake
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Re: Guide: You're an undergrad student (or in high school!) and you want to go to law school

Post by proteinshake » Wed May 02, 2018 2:08 am

HelloYesThisIsDog wrote:
Tue May 01, 2018 11:39 pm

But really, what should I major in?
No really, you can study ANYTHING you want.
would you suggest staying away majoring in Legal Studies or Pre-Law?

BearCat
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Re: Guide: You're an undergrad student (or in high school!) and you want to go to law school

Post by BearCat » Wed May 02, 2018 3:09 am

proteinshake wrote:
Wed May 02, 2018 2:08 am
HelloYesThisIsDog wrote:
Tue May 01, 2018 11:39 pm

But really, what should I major in?
No really, you can study ANYTHING you want.
would you suggest staying away majoring in Legal Studies or Pre-Law?
Pre-law isn't a major, and I would suggest staying away from "legal studies" only because it's not really employable if you don't go to law school. A lot can change by the time you graduate. Major in something that can get you a job. If you really want some law, pick up a poli sci minor or something.

If you want an ~advantage~, STEM majors do disproportionately well on the LSAT, as do philosophy majors.

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proteinshake
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Re: Guide: You're an undergrad student (or in high school!) and you want to go to law school

Post by proteinshake » Wed May 02, 2018 3:18 am

BearCat wrote:
Wed May 02, 2018 3:09 am
proteinshake wrote:
Wed May 02, 2018 2:08 am
HelloYesThisIsDog wrote:
Tue May 01, 2018 11:39 pm

But really, what should I major in?
No really, you can study ANYTHING you want.
would you suggest staying away majoring in Legal Studies or Pre-Law?
Pre-law isn't a major, and I would suggest staying away from "legal studies" only because it's not really employable if you don't go to law school. A lot can change by the time you graduate. Major in something that can get you a job. If you really want some law, pick up a poli sci minor or something.

If you want an ~advantage~, STEM majors do disproportionately well on the LSAT, as do philosophy majors.
could’ve sworn pre-law was a major at some schools but I might’ve just been thinking of legal studies

but yeah, I think majoring in philosophy definitely helped me a ton

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Re: Guide: You're an undergrad student (or in high school!) and you want to go to law school

Post by Nony » Wed May 02, 2018 6:45 am

Pre-Law is actually a major in some schools. One thing is that it’s not really an academic field - it’s a conglomeration of a lot of sort of related classes but there is no scholarly field “pre-Law,” so it gets looked down on.

I’m pretty sure it’s philosophy majors that top the “success on the LSAT” chart, not English majors. The thing is, I would not recommend picking a major because it does well on the LSAT due to correlation/causation issues. Like if you pick physics because physics majors do well on the LSAT, but you, personally, hate physics and are not good at it, I really really doubt you’re going to do better on the LSAT than if you’d majored in French, which is your passion and which you ace. Major in what you would major in if you weren’t going to law school.

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Re: Guide: You're an undergrad student (or in high school!) and you want to go to law school

Post by Dr.Degrees_Cr.Cash » Wed May 02, 2018 7:16 am

My school had a law studies major, but it was a terrible major.

As nony said, it was just an amalgamation of any classes you wanted really. Probably looked down on and definitely didn't give you any real skills.

Bussiness majors (especially accounting) turned to be real sleeper majors for legal exposure, there wasn't a lot of policy, more just like an overview of the legal system and some rules that have come to be, but I ended up taking three legal classes, one of which was all UCC.

I'm sure ymmv, but honestly if someone is looking for a degree that gets them "legal exposure" but wants something that will give them tangible skills for legal employment then I highly recommend. They're not the absolute easiest majors, but they're far from the hardest you can take, I took 1 fewer classes one semester and had no problem studying for the LSAT and keeping my GPA up, but I also went to a pretty easy school so :roll: :roll:

Generally speaking I think if you can take 5 classes easily, then you can take 4 classes + study easily, but you shouldn't be think about the LSAT much right now

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Re: Guide: You're an undergrad student (or in high school!) and you want to go to law school

Post by Vexed » Wed May 02, 2018 10:47 am

One thing I might add for undergrads that are really itching to get some exposure to "law" is to see if your school has a mock trial team. Teams tend to be coached by lawyers/JDs and I found the process of breaking down the elements of a case in that context to be very similar to how a lot of my profs taught certain subjects as a 1L (plus the cases tend to map to very basic 1L subject-areas, so you might get a slight leg up when you get there).

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HelloYesThisIsDog
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Re: Guide: You're an undergrad student (or in high school!) and you want to go to law school

Post by HelloYesThisIsDog » Wed May 02, 2018 10:55 am

Nony wrote:
Wed May 02, 2018 6:45 am
Pre-Law is actually a major in some schools. One thing is that it’s not really an academic field - it’s a conglomeration of a lot of sort of related classes but there is no scholarly field “pre-Law,” so it gets looked down on.

I’m pretty sure it’s philosophy majors that top the “success on the LSAT” chart, not English majors. The thing is, I would not recommend picking a major because it does well on the LSAT due to correlation/causation issues. Like if you pick physics because physics majors do well on the LSAT, but you, personally, hate physics and are not good at it, I really really doubt you’re going to do better on the LSAT than if you’d majored in French, which is your passion and which you ace. Major in what you would major in if you weren’t going to law school.
Found links to the blog posts that discussed this, and you are correct. I have updated the post to reflect. English apparently is middle of the pack.

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HelloYesThisIsDog
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Re: Guide: You're an undergrad student (or in high school!) and you want to go to law school

Post by HelloYesThisIsDog » Wed May 02, 2018 11:01 am

Vexed wrote:
Wed May 02, 2018 10:47 am
One thing I might add for undergrads that are really itching to get some exposure to "law" is to see if your school has a mock trial team. Teams tend to be coached by lawyers/JDs and I found the process of breaking down the elements of a case in that context to be very similar to how a lot of my profs taught certain subjects as a 1L (plus the cases tend to map to very basic 1L subject-areas, so you might get a slight leg up when you get there).
Good point, post updated.

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Re: Guide: You're an undergrad student (or in high school!) and you want to go to law school

Post by jeff chiles » Wed May 02, 2018 11:09 am

Vexed wrote:
Wed May 02, 2018 10:47 am
One thing I might add for undergrads that are really itching to get some exposure to "law" is to see if your school has a mock trial team. Teams tend to be coached by lawyers/JDs and I found the process of breaking down the elements of a case in that context to be very similar to how a lot of my profs taught certain subjects as a 1L (plus the cases tend to map to very basic 1L subject-areas, so you might get a slight leg up when you get there).
I strongly recommend this, I am pretty ambivalent about a lot of aspects of mock trial but it was a great way to meet practicing attorneys, judges, and law students as an undergrad and get a better idea of what they do.

Idk about the 1L subject areas but mock trial was extremely good preparation for evidence as a 2L. Coming into that class with a decent grasp of hearsay and relevancy made it very easy.

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Re: Guide: You're an undergrad student (or in high school!) and you want to go to law school

Post by bojack93 » Wed May 02, 2018 11:30 am

I'd also add a section about cultivating relationships with professors who can write you strong recommendations when the time comes. Things like going to office hours, taking multiple classes with the same professor (if possible), and bringing them in as readers on your thesis (very dependent on the situation, this is something that I did) are helpful. After college, it's worthwhile to keep in touch. This can be awkward, but less so if you reach out early and with some frequency, i.e. annually. If you're pretty sure you're going to law school, it's also worth asking them before you leave if they'd be willing to write you a recommendation at some point. Some professors might save a file to make their eventual process easier.

The longer you wait before heading to law school, the more difficult it will be for a professor to write a compelling, personal letter for you. One thing that helps is saving copies of the major (and best) assignments you complete for that professor. As a humanities major, I wrote papers galore and sent a few of the ones my professors seemed to particularly enjoy to help them remember that they liked me.

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Re: Guide: You're an undergrad student (or in high school!) and you want to go to law school

Post by HelloYesThisIsDog » Wed May 02, 2018 12:21 pm

Dr.Degrees_Cr.Cash wrote:
Wed May 02, 2018 7:16 am
They're not the absolute easiest majors, but they're far from the hardest you can take, I took 1 fewer classes one semester and had no problem studying for the LSAT and keeping my GPA up, but I also went to a pretty easy school so :roll: :roll:

Generally speaking I think if you can take 5 classes easily, then you can take 4 classes + study easily, but you shouldn't be think about the LSAT much right now
My problem with this advice is not everyone will get to where they need to be on the LSAT with the same amount of time that worked for you. Different people learn differently. I think it's better to make sure your uGPA is high and stays that way before thinking of methods to carve out time to do LSAT prep.

There's an argument that it might be harder to prep when working full time, but you also aren't constrained artificially by a deadline such as only being able to take one fewer class for one semester/quarter. You can take as long as you want to prep once you're done with college.

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Re: Guide: You're an undergrad student (or in high school!) and you want to go to law school

Post by Barry » Wed May 02, 2018 12:43 pm

This guide is fantastic. Thank you for making it.

I wanted to add one thought. Since high schoolers might also read this post, it could be worth a couple sentences on the OP to talk about UG "prestige".

Seniors in high school that are thinking about law school might be prone to picking a highly ranked UG at great cost, thinking it can guarantee a top tier law school acceptance.

But I love this guide. I wish it was around on the old site. Thank you again for making it.

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Re: Guide: You're an undergrad student (or in high school!) and you want to go to law school

Post by b-a-n-a-n-a-s » Wed May 02, 2018 1:39 pm

HelloYesThisIsDog wrote:
Tue May 01, 2018 11:39 pm
There are no retakes for your undergrad GPA. In the words of Ru Paul, don't fuck it up.
Come thru, Mama Ru! Great guide :)

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Re: Guide: You're an undergrad student (or in high school!) and you want to go to law school

Post by HelloYesThisIsDog » Wed May 02, 2018 5:46 pm

Barry wrote:
Wed May 02, 2018 12:43 pm
This guide is fantastic. Thank you for making it.

I wanted to add one thought. Since high schoolers might also read this post, it could be worth a couple sentences on the OP to talk about UG "prestige".

Seniors in high school that are thinking about law school might be prone to picking a highly ranked UG at great cost, thinking it can guarantee a top tier law school acceptance.

But I love this guide. I wish it was around on the old site. Thank you again for making it.
Updated, thanks for the suggestion.

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Re: Guide: You're an undergrad student (or in high school!) and you want to go to law school

Post by HelloYesThisIsDog » Wed May 02, 2018 6:04 pm

bojack93 wrote:
Wed May 02, 2018 11:30 am
I'd also add a section about cultivating relationships with professors who can write you strong recommendations when the time comes. Things like going to office hours, taking multiple classes with the same professor (if possible), and bringing them in as readers on your thesis (very dependent on the situation, this is something that I did) are helpful. After college, it's worthwhile to keep in touch. This can be awkward, but less so if you reach out early and with some frequency, i.e. annually. If you're pretty sure you're going to law school, it's also worth asking them before you leave if they'd be willing to write you a recommendation at some point. Some professors might save a file to make their eventual process easier.

The longer you wait before heading to law school, the more difficult it will be for a professor to write a compelling, personal letter for you. One thing that helps is saving copies of the major (and best) assignments you complete for that professor. As a humanities major, I wrote papers galore and sent a few of the ones my professors seemed to particularly enjoy to help them remember that they liked me.
Added. Thanks for the suggestion.

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Re: Guide: You're an undergrad student (or in high school!) and you want to go to law school

Post by HelloYesThisIsDog » Wed May 02, 2018 10:45 pm

b-a-n-a-n-a-s wrote:
Wed May 02, 2018 1:39 pm
HelloYesThisIsDog wrote:
Tue May 01, 2018 11:39 pm
There are no retakes for your undergrad GPA. In the words of Ru Paul, don't fuck it up.
Come thru, Mama Ru! Great guide :)
I'm glad someone caught that reference. I work with a bunch of straights and they never have any clue what I'm talking about when I mention drag race in conversation.

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Re: Guide: You're an undergrad student (or in high school!) and you want to go to law school

Post by UVA2B » Wed May 02, 2018 10:50 pm

Awesome guide that fits our ethos here!

I'm going to sticky this, but there is genuine conversation that this guide deserves, which I think Dog is ready to handle. Thanks for all of the effort!

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Re: Guide: You're an undergrad student (or in high school!) and you want to go to law school

Post by HelloYesThisIsDog » Thu May 03, 2018 12:12 am

UVA2B wrote:
Wed May 02, 2018 10:50 pm
Awesome guide that fits our ethos here!

I'm going to sticky this, but there is genuine conversation that this guide deserves, which I think Dog is ready to handle. Thanks for all of the effort!
Thanks. Happy to engage on questions. My goal was to bring in folks that have the inquiries in the guide. They were numerous at TLS and it felt inefficient doling out the same advice over and over. Hopefully this sets a baseline to work from for particular questions and situations.

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Re: Guide: You're an undergrad student (or in high school!) and you want to go to law school

Post by sev » Mon May 07, 2018 12:54 pm

You sort of say this, but people should at least consider their GPA when it comes to selecting a major/classes. My mentor gave me advice along the lines of "if you're dead set on law school, pick easy classes." I chose not to take his advice and likely forfeited my shot at HYS/full rides in the T13 because I wanted to challenge myself with math.

I wouldn't change what I did, but I didn't really believe him and didn't realize what I was giving up by taking classes that I couldn't get As in. I think people should at least know what they're giving up by losing a couple tenths on their GPA.

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Re: Guide: You're an undergrad student (or in high school!) and you want to go to law school

Post by HelloYesThisIsDog » Mon May 07, 2018 6:41 pm

sev wrote:
Mon May 07, 2018 12:54 pm
You sort of say this, but people should at least consider their GPA when it comes to selecting a major/classes. My mentor gave me advice along the lines of "if you're dead set on law school, pick easy classes." I chose not to take his advice and likely forfeited my shot at HYS/full rides in the T13 because I wanted to challenge myself with math.

I wouldn't change what I did, but I didn't really believe him and didn't realize what I was giving up by taking classes that I couldn't get As in. I think people should at least know what they're giving up by losing a couple tenths on their GPA.
I'm torn about giving this as advice because I think someone out there may take it very literally, and my inner idealist wants to encourage people to have a lifelong love of learning, not to just pick easy courses to skate through. I also think math is so important as a field of study!

Maybe the better way to couch it is "be really interested in what you study while being realistic about your ability to keep up with it and do it well. Advanced physics is crazy interesting, but it's no cakewalk and it may be completely unintuitive to you. Keep those two aspects balanced when picking your major."

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Re: Guide: You're an undergrad student (or in high school!) and you want to go to law school

Post by sev » Wed May 09, 2018 10:55 am

HelloYesThisIsDog wrote:
Mon May 07, 2018 6:41 pm

I'm torn about giving this as advice because I think someone out there may take it very literally, and my inner idealist wants to encourage people to have a lifelong love of learning, not to just pick easy courses to skate through. I also think math is so important as a field of study!

Maybe the better way to couch it is "be really interested in what you study while being realistic about your ability to keep up with it and do it well. Advanced physics is crazy interesting, but it's no cakewalk and it may be completely unintuitive to you. Keep those two aspects balanced when picking your major."
That's definitely fair--I'd hate for someone to choose to major in history because an online forum told them to major in something easy and then they find out that can't get a job after graduation after they've ruled out law school. You're right, balance is important.

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Re: Guide: You're an undergrad student (or in high school!) and you want to go to law school

Post by SCGAnneD » Fri May 11, 2018 3:38 pm

This is a phenomenal guide. Great job!

Addendum: See if your school has an undergraduate mock trial team, or start one if it does not. Mock trial is often coached by lawyers/folks with JDs, and the process can be akin to some (not all) aspects of your future legal education. You also will gain valuable public speaking skills. Anecdotally, one of my law school classmates that did undergrad mock trial was an absolute boss in law school, consistently winning each mock trial competition she participated in.
TCan I humbly suggest also exploring Moot Court http://www.acmamootcourt.org/? I coached an undergrad Moot team for 8 years and the skills students develop in it (reading and briefing cases, critical thinking, logical reasoning, public speaking, etc.,) are phenomenal. Moot is less common than mock in undergrad, but it's growing. If your school doesn't have a team, reach out to the national organization or PM me and I'll put you in touch with someone.

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Re: Guide: You're an undergrad student (or in high school!) and you want to go to law school

Post by soj » Fri May 25, 2018 11:09 am

HelloYesThisIsDog wrote:
Tue May 01, 2018 11:39 pm
If you're an international student, the question of whether it's accredited is trickier and I don't know the answer, but at the very least, it should be a real place and not a diploma mill.
I am not an expert on this and this should probably be a separate guide (not by me), but international students educated outside the US, its territories, and Canada will generally have to submit their transcripts to LSAC for evaluation, a process that takes a few weeks. If you weren't educated in an English-speaking country, you might also have to take an English proficiency test. Finally, if your undergrad studies were in law, you might be applying for an LLM, not a JD.

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HelloYesThisIsDog
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Re: Guide: You're an undergrad student (or in high school!) and you want to go to law school

Post by HelloYesThisIsDog » Fri May 25, 2018 11:49 am

Yes, thank you SOJ.

I agree, we need a separate guide. There are a lot of unique issues for international students.

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