law review submissions

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Borhas
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law review submissions

Post by Borhas » Tue Jan 30, 2018 7:44 pm

I have always thought that law review was a pointless endeavor, and I still do, at least with respect to law students. On the other hand, over the course of my work and research (for my work) I have developed some pretty novel but grounded theories re: dui laws. Is it pointless to try to get them published? Assuming management lets me do it.

ETA: If not pointless, then is there a right or wrong way to write it (other than legal writing in general)?


(I never did anything with law review in law school, although I remember using the bluebook at times)

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Nony
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Re: law review submissions

Post by Nony » Tue Jan 30, 2018 7:57 pm

I don’t think publishing is ever pointless (though I would say that), although if it’s going to cause you angst/suffering to write it up I’m not sure it’s worth it. Mostly it’s a good way to gain credibility and maybe get involved in discussions about that area of law (I’m assuming that you don’t want to be a law prof). Eugene Volokh (I think?) has a book on Legal Academic Writing which is supposed to be very good on how to write up stuff like this. (I bet you can get a used copy cheap.)

BearCat
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Re: law review submissions

Post by BearCat » Wed Jan 31, 2018 10:58 am

Speaking from the perspective of a law review board member, I don't think we've ever published an article not from a professor of some kind. You could look into specialty journals? We also publish commentaries, so you could look into writing one of those.

Also, while it sucks ass doing LR work, it's a lot less work than a full 2 credit hour class and my editing skills have vastly improved as a result (I used to have a problem with typos, errors, and general lack of attention to detail in my work product--this is no more the case), so I think LR is a net positive for law students. LR is great for 3Ls, but admittedly is horrible for 2Ls (mostly because of the mandatory student note).

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pancakes3
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Re: law review submissions

Post by pancakes3 » Wed Jan 31, 2018 11:00 am

don't ABA, state bar, and local bar publish stuff all the time? or are you gunning for more preftige?

edit: post it HERE on LSL.

brut
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Re: law review submissions

Post by brut » Wed Jan 31, 2018 11:36 am

IPeeLaw wrote:
Wed Jan 31, 2018 10:58 am
Speaking from the perspective of a law review board member, I don't think we've ever published an article not from a professor of some kind. You could look into specialty journals? We also publish commentaries, so you could look into writing one of those.

Also, while it sucks ass doing LR work, it's a lot less work than a full 2 credit hour class and my editing skills have vastly improved as a result (I used to have a problem with typos, errors, and general lack of attention to detail in my work product--this is no more the case), so I think LR is a net positive for law students. LR is great for 3Ls, but admittedly is horrible for 2Ls (mostly because of the mandatory student note).
agree it's exceedingly difficult to publish if you're not a prof. many first cut decisions made on basis of cv alone, sadly. not just anecdotal, there's a whole navel gazing literature about l rev publication decisions. in any event, maybe you can submit to online supplements. or collaborate w/ a prof in your field. or target l revs w/ blind review (not many tho). or publish in secondary journal or as pancakes suggested a non-academic journal.

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Nony
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Re: law review submissions

Post by Nony » Wed Jan 31, 2018 11:54 am

Some LRs at lesser schools like mine would probably consider you. :lol: Also I think a secondary crim law journal would be interested.

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Nebby
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Re: law review submissions

Post by Nebby » Wed Jan 31, 2018 12:24 pm

Borhas wrote:
Tue Jan 30, 2018 7:44 pm
I have always thought that law review was a pointless endeavor, and I still do, at least with respect to law students. On the other hand, over the course of my work and research (for my work) I have developed some pretty novel but grounded theories re: dui laws. Is it pointless to try to get them published? Assuming management lets me do it.

ETA: If not pointless, then is there a right or wrong way to write it (other than legal writing in general)?


(I never did anything with law review in law school, although I remember using the bluebook at times)
Bar publications are a great place for practitioners to publish. Typically, the type of work practitioners publish is more practical and, therefore, should be read by people that will get some use out of it. Law Reviews are exclusively for professors who need something to do other than pull in 6 figs for 30 hours a week. :lol:

You can publish in secondary journals, too.

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bikeflip
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Re: law review submissions

Post by bikeflip » Wed Jan 31, 2018 6:21 pm

Borhas, what's your end goal? Are you trying to change legislation or the minds of judges and prosecutors?

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Borhas
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Re: law review submissions

Post by Borhas » Wed Jan 31, 2018 8:48 pm

I suppose a lot of reasons, in no particular order: 1) management believes that we are required to (and I agree) follow the code of judicial conduct which encourages this sort of community/educational engagement... so it would also look good to management 2) advance the credibility of our subunit of the agency within the agency 3) increase my own credibility 4) work out these ideas that I've had to research anyway and come up with a more coherent explanation so 5) I can convince my peers to critically examine their own views 6) encourage a less incompetent and retarded legal analysis by the prosecutors and the defense bar and 7) hope that the COA eventually rules on the issue so there is more clarity

the downsides are that I don't want to spend a ton of time polishing something only to have rejected because I don't have prestigious credentials (and I objectively do not) I have my pride to consider

ETA I didn't even consider the state bar organization, I'm not a member (attorneys dont have to join) so I didn't know but it looks like they do this sort of thing too

BearCat
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Re: law review submissions

Post by BearCat » Thu Feb 01, 2018 11:48 am

Where do people who teach CLE stuff come from? You could do some of that? Give CLE talks?

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Nebby
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Re: law review submissions

Post by Nebby » Thu Feb 01, 2018 1:51 pm

IPeeLaw wrote:
Thu Feb 01, 2018 11:48 am
Where do people who teach CLE stuff come from? You could do some of that? Give CLE talks?
A good way to get into that is through bar associations. Chicago Bar Association, for instance, has tons of committees that are always looking for CLE speakers. Borhas, for instance, could do a CLE on DUI laws or something for the Criminal Law committee, etc. Other BAs may have similar set-ups.

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Borhas
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Re: law review submissions

Post by Borhas » Thu Feb 01, 2018 8:41 pm

I wouldn't want to lecture to a bunch of bored DUI lawyers. If it's like most CLE classes I've taken, whoever is watching you is bored af.

But, I've helped give a training at a PD office, I think I would want to do more of that.

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