Supreme Court Clinics

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oxfordrama
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Supreme Court Clinics

Post by oxfordrama » Fri Feb 23, 2018 11:33 pm

Anyone (especially at Penn) know or become someone who participated in an SC clinic? Probably tip-top students only? How was the experience personally or professionally?

bruh
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Re: Supreme Court Clinics

Post by bruh » Sat Feb 24, 2018 1:40 am

This is premature. Once you're in law school, all of your questions regarding your school-specific clinics will be answered. For the record, most clinics at schools (especially T14) are not grades based--at least not officially.

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oxfordrama
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Re: Supreme Court Clinics

Post by oxfordrama » Sat Feb 24, 2018 2:44 am

You think it's too early or improper to be asking about this now because I will be able to quickly and easily get the answer in the fall? I'd also like talk about it now as well with anyone who has time to kill. It does build perspective/intuitive feelings. Thanks for the last bit.

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pancakes3
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Re: Supreme Court Clinics

Post by pancakes3 » Sat Feb 24, 2018 7:56 am

https://www.law.upenn.edu/clinic/supremecourt/
Without the talents of [the SCOTUS Clinic] and their students, it is very possible that the Court would not have understood the true merits of our case.

wsbl
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Re: Supreme Court Clinics

Post by wsbl » Sun Feb 25, 2018 11:56 am

Not in the Penn SC clinic; know a few who are. They (the ones I know) are top students, and namely ones who are doing a couple of clerkships after graduation, and I would assume aiming/hoping/praying for perhaps a chance at SC clerkship. They do rave about the professional experience, since they are directly involved in SC case(s).

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Sinoper
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Re: Supreme Court Clinics

Post by Sinoper » Wed Feb 28, 2018 2:48 pm

At Northwestern, there is no application process, grade cutoffs, or anything like that for the Supreme Court Clinic. You and the rest of your classmates have a set number of points to bid on classes every year. You can choose to bid on the Supreme Court Clinic. If your bid is high enough, you'll get a slot. It's normally a pretty expensive course, which just means you have less points to bid on everything else. Interestingly enough though, based on past bidding data, it's not always or even usually the most expensive course (although it is one of the more expensive ones).

brut
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Re: Supreme Court Clinics

Post by brut » Wed Mar 14, 2018 3:46 pm

wonder how much of this is school contingent. i imagine jeff fisher and pam karlan aren't taking all comers.

Goldie
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Re: Supreme Court Clinics

Post by Goldie » Mon Jul 16, 2018 4:12 pm

I was a part of the HLS Supreme Court clinic. It was a fantastic experience. Unlike some, it's not a full semester long; it's just in HLS's J-term (so about three weeks). There are ten students, and these are usually split into groups of ~3 to either write a cert petition or a brief in opposition to cert or an amicus brief. There are also classes about the Supreme Court and Supreme Court litigation, and chances to meet with Supreme Court people (my year we met with a Justice and the SG and a DC Circuit judge and Nina Totenberg and some SCOTUS lawyers) and attend an oral argument. It's by-application only (the Goldstein & Russell folks run the clinic and I believe make the selections), and the students there tend to be somewhere in the top 10% or so and either on law review or part of BSA.

dodo
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Re: Supreme Court Clinics

Post by dodo » Mon Jul 16, 2018 8:19 pm

Stanford's Supreme Court Clinic is a quarter long and spans the full fall or spring quarter. Like the other clinics at Stanford, it's a full-time commitment and you're generally not allowed to take classes at the same time. You will write two briefs in teams of three and be assisted by one or two part-time advanced students who participated in the clinic in a previous quarter. Typically, you'll work on one brief at the certiorari stage (cert petition or brief in opposition) and one merits brief, but it doesn't always work out that way. I did not work on a merits brief as a full-time clinic student, but returned as a part-time advanced student when certiorari was granted to one of my cases and eventually attended the oral argument for that case. I don't practice appellate litigation, but I learned a lot and enjoyed the experience a great deal.

Admissions is competitive. Most people have feeder clerkships or other clerkships in desirable locations lined up, so grades seem to be important. But not everyone in the clinic is at the very top of the class and not everyone at the top of the class does this clinic. Roughly 10% of the class ends up doing the Supreme Court clinic at some point and plenty of top students don't even apply, so anyone in the top 20-25% should be competitive. And if you want to work on appellate litigation, there are other clinics that let you write Supreme Court amicus briefs or even argue a case at the court of appeals level. The other clinics don't consider grades in the application process.

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